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Liberal Arts Management Courses

Lists many courses offered in the liberal arts program. Specific offerings by term, including specific selected topics, can be view for spring, fall and summer terms.

Courses Available in Liberal Arts

Liberal Arts encompasses a broad range of courses. This listing represents courses that are not applied toward other SPCS majors, but individual degree requirements determine whether a specific class will count toward a degree or certificate.

ACCT 300U Survey of Accounting Principles
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analytical and interpretative approach to the study of financial and managerial accounting. Emphasizes effects of transactions on financial statements; interrelationships among financial statements; use of financial statements, cost accounting, and budgets for decision-making.

ACCT 301U Fundamentals of Financial Accounting
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic theory, concepts, and procedures necessary to develop and interpret publicly reported financial accounting data.

ACCT 302U Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic theory, concepts, and procedures necessary to develop and interpret managerial accounting data, including cost and budget information, and capital project evaluations, for managerial decision-making.
Prerequisites
ACCT 300U or ACCT 301U recommended.

ACCT 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ACCT 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 200U Experiential Learning and Portfolio Preparation
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of experiential learning, portfolio assessment and other alternative methods of earning college credit. Students gain confidence in critical thinking, organizing, and writing and a clearer sense of educational goals. In preparation for submitting a portfolio, students learn how to identify and assess learning that has occurred outside of the classroom, develop a narrative, and document their learning. This class is required for students planning to request credit by portfolio assessment.

ADED 201U Portfolio Submission/Assessment
Semester hours: 0
Description
For students who wish to seek credit for prior learning through the Portfolio program.
Prerequisites
ADED 200U

ADED 299U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-3

ADED 300U Knowledge Management - Methods of Learning and Thinking
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring techniques of learning and developing access skills and opportunities for critical thinking.

ADED 301U Knowledge Management: Seminar Across the Disciplines I
Semester hours: 3
Description
ADED 301U develops advanced reading, writing, and research techniques, using a variety of disciplinary approaches. It will require students to read a range of primary and scholarly texts related to the content of the course, synthesizing them in assignments of varying medium, length, and purpose. It will also require them to locate, evaluate, and incorporate a wide range of research sources. Explicit writing instruction will be central to the course.
Prerequisites
ENGL 203U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ADED 302U Knowledge Management: Seminar Across the Disciplines II
Semester hours: 3
Description
ADED 302U builds upon the skills developed in ADED 301U, culminating with a significant research project. It will require students to read a range of primary and scholarly texts related to the content of the course, synthesizing them in assignments of varying medium, length, and purpose - including a research-driven essay and presentation. Explicit research instruction will be central to the course.
Prerequisites
Completion of ADED 301U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ADED 350U Training Design and Facilitation
Semester hours: 3
Description
Design, implementation, and evaluation of adult training programs, with emphasis on increasing individual and organizational effectiveness. Includes adult learning theory, presentation methods, and techniques to measure trainer's effectiveness.

ADED 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 301U North American Indians
Semester hours: 3
Description
By 1492 Native Americans lived in wide variety of cultures all over North America. Focuses on specific groups in each region from Arctic hunters to Southeastern kingdoms and confederacies. Daily life before European contact discussed, along with what happened when cultures clashed.

ANTH 315U Introduction to Physical Anthropology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Combines research and data from biological and social sciences. Primarily concerned with human beings as biological entities and the relationship between human biology and culture. In addition to basic evolutionary theory and principles of biological inheritance, topics include hominid evolution, primate studies, biological and cultural adaptation to new and/or changing environments, and forensic anthropology. Current issues include cloning, DNA manipulation, Out of Africa vs. Multi-evolution theories, race as a cultural, non-biological construction.

ANTH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ARCH 300U Archaeology of Ancient Civilizations
Semester hours: 3
Description
The rise and fall of ancient civilizations through archaeological investigations.

ARCH 305U Images of the Past: Introduction to Archaeology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Around the world - across four million years. Focus on archaeological sites that have had major impact on knowledge of ourselves. Journey begins with origins of human beings and ends with rise of great civilizations in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Investigation of how archaeologists have interpreted artifacts and bones to tell story of human prehistory.

ARCH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ARCH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 208U Techniques and Aesthetics of Photography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Hands-on explanation of technical process involved with black and white photography from exposure to finished print with detailed instruction of processing and printing, classroom critique of students' and other professional work, and introduction to different types of photography. Students encouraged to express desires, emotions, and intentions visually through photographic medium.

ART 209U Photography as Art
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic black and white darkroom techniques emphasizing development of aesthetic sensibilities. History of photography through exposure to work of past and contemporary photographers.

ART 212U Art Appreciation
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to the arts, designed to broaden students' background.

ART 299U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 300U Color Photography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to technical considerations and development of artistic expression with color materials. Student work discussed in context of larger aesthetic history of color photography. Focus placed on new media and electronic darkroom.

ART 301U Introduction to Photoshop
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to using Photoshop as a digital darkroom and a powerful means of processing images using digital and traditional photography. Topics will include navigation and tools, selections and layer masks, history palette and history brush, file formats, color correction, digital zone system, and image resolution.

ART 302U Advanced Photoshop for Photographers
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed as an online course for students who have a strong understanding of the fundamentals of Photoshop and an interest in taking their study further. The software program will be used as a creative tool to achieve aesthetic results through digital techniques.

ART 313U American Art: Colonial to 1890
Semester hours: 3
Description
North American art from colonial beginnings. Folk art and crafts, regionalism, romanticism.

ART 314U American Art: 1890 to Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
From 1890s through present day, course includes regionalism, abstract expressionist pop art, and contemporary trends.

ART 315U Art of the Renaissance
Semester hours: 3
Description
Italian and Northern Renaissance Art.

ART 316U Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S.: 1861 to the Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
Certain terrible catastrophes/disasters that America has suffered from 1861 to the present have had particularly strong influences on the nation. This course examines several such events, their impact, and how and why that impact took shape as it did. The role of presentation of the disasters through media, literature, government action, and especially the arts will be analyzed.

ART 317U Nineteenth-Century Art
Semester hours: 3
Description
Major art trends during 19th century.

ART 318U The Gilded Age
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Gilded Age in American history was the modern United States¿ formative period. It was an exciting, exuberant, innovative, progressive, glittering era in which America was in the process of becoming a world power. But the Gilded Age was also an era of greed, guile, corruption, poverty, and inequality. Learn about the rise of America to global status, about the American artists of the period and their work, about the nation¿s urbanization and industrialization, about the new American millionaires, and about why Mark Twain called the era "gilded" rather than "golden."

ART 324U Impressionism, Post Impressionism
Semester hours: 3
Description
Major European impressionists and postimpressionists from 1860-1900.

ART 328U Women in the Arts
Semester hours: 3
Description
From Renaissance through twentieth century, course focuses on relationship of female artists to society and culture in which they lived and worked. While emphasis is on female artists, male artists' images related to women explored.

ART 329U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

ART 345U Philanthropy in the Arts
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of strategies, tools and techniques involved in generating contributed income for arts organizations from private individuals, foundations, corporations, businesses and government agencies. Central issues addressed include the underlying psychological and practical bases of fundraising in the arts and exposure to the research methods involved in developing donor prospects. Students will learn a variety of techniques for soliciting contributions, including direct mail, telemarketing, grant writing, personal appeals, major gift solicitations, special events, capital campaigns, endowment campaigns, sponsorships and planning.
Prerequisites
MUS 310U or permission of the instructor.

ART 347U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of life and times of Thomas Jefferson including historical perspective of him as statesman, politician, and writer as well as study of him as architect and planner. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

ART 360U Victorian England: Whistler, Ruskin and the Nature of Truth
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on opposing concepts of truth in Victorian England as exemplified and espoused by two major cultural figures of the time, John Ruskin and James McNeill Whistler.

ART 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 516U Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S.: 1861 to the Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
Certain terrible catastrophes/disasters that America has suffered from 1861 to the present have had particularly strong influences on the nation. This course examines several such events, their impact, and how and why that impact took shape as it did. The role of presentation of the disasters through media, literature, government action, and especially the arts will be analyzed.

ART 518U The Gilded Age
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Gilded Age in American history was the modern United States' formative period. It was an exciting, exuberant, innovative, progressive, glittering era in which America was in the process of becoming a world power. But the Gilded Age was also an era of greed, guile, corruption, poverty, and inequality. Learn about the rise of America to global status, about the American artists of the period and their work, about the nation¿s urbanization and industrialization, about the new American millionaires, and about why Mark Twain called the era "gilded" rather than "golden."

ART 529U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

ART 547U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of the life and times of Thomas Jefferson, including historical perspective of Jefferson as statesman, politician, writer, architect and planner. Use of primary sources is emphasized in the course. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

ART 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ARTS 105U Art for Non-Majors: Introduction to Drawing
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to drawing materials and techniques; the basics of two-dimensional design, including a brief introduction to color theory. The semester will culminate in the execution of a three-dimensional work of art. No previous experience will be assumed; a hands-on, lab-style course.

ARTS 115U Art for Non-Majors: Introduction to Painting
Semester hours: 3
Description
Students will explore the traditional use of oil paints and techniques through both still life and abstract painting assignments. Lectures on art history, technical demonstrations. Some previous drawing experience is suggested; it is not required.

ARTS 125U Art for Non-Majors: Introduction to Design
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to the basic elements of design (line, shape, value, texture, and hue), the principles of design (unity and variety, balance, repetition, rhythm, movement, and emphasis), the elements of color (hue, value, and saturation), and the basics of drawing (proportion and tone) through lectures, demonstrations and assignments.

ARTS 126U Drawing Materials and Techniques
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction for both beginners and more advanced students to explore a wide variety of drawing materials and techniques. The materials introduced will include graphite, charcoal, pastels, ink, conte, and silverpoint. Techniques covered will be hatching and cross-hatching, stippling, additive and subtractive drawing, working with washes, monoprinting and more. Students will work representationally for the majority of the semester. The objective is for students to explore a wide range of drawing possibilities as a means of expressing themselves visually.

ARTS 127U Watercolors
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of the use of traditional and experimental watercolor painting techniques. Landscape, still life, and architecture will serve as the subjects of the students' paintings. Students will also work on abstract and non-objective projects. Previous painting and drawing experience is not required. Effort and attendance are essential to the student¿s success.

ARTS 198U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-3

ARTS 305U Digital Photography
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed as an introduction to creative digital photography as a fine art. Students will learn the basics of camera controls, exposure, lighting, and composition. The class will participate in discussions on the concept of a digital aesthetic. The software program Adobe Photoshop will be used as a digital darkroom preparing images to print. Topics will include digital adjustments and output along with digital printing. The genres of portraiture, nature, action, and landscape will be explored through hands-on assignments. A digital camera with manual adjustments for exposure is required.

ARTS 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 221U Environmental Biology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Humankind's position in and influence on ecosystems of world viewed biologically and physically.

BIOL 280U Human Anatomy with Lab
Semester hours: 3.5
Description
Survey of basic human anatomy, with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and nervous systems.
Prerequisites
Departmental approval

BIOL 299U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-3

BIOL 301U Environmental Ethics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of complexities of environmental relationships and issues including scientific knowledge, economic, political, social, and moral values within the U.S. and between countries of the world. Will explore alternative solutions to environmental problems from multiple perspectives through various value/moral systems.

BIOL 302U Global Sustainability
Semester hours: 3
Description
Global Sustainability examines the twenty-five global issues that the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development has identified as the most critical global social, economic and environmental challenges that are driving global change. Having gained an understanding of these forces and how societies can adapt to become more sustainable, students learn how to develop approaches to address the challenges.

BIOL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 502U Global Sustainability
Semester hours: 3
Description
Global Sustainability examines the twenty-five global issues that the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development has identified as the most critical global social, economic and environmental challenges that are driving global change. Having gained an understanding of these forces and how societies can adapt to become more sustainable, students learn how to develop approaches to address the challenges.

BIOL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

CLAC 250U Spanish: Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Spanish materials relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Proficiency in Spanish or permission of instructor and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 251U French: Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic French materials relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Proficiency in French or permission of instructor and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 257U Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: Other
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic materials in another language relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Permission of department and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 299U Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: Independent Study
Semester hours: 1
Prerequisites
Registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past.

CLAC 550U Spanish: Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Spanish materials relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Proficiency in Spanish or permission of instructor and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 551U French: Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic French materials relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Proficiency in French or permission of instructor and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 557U Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: Other
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic materials in another language relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Permission of department and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 599U Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: Independent Study
Semester hours: 1
Prerequisites
Registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past.

ECON 201U Microeconomics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of supply and demand, market structure, production, market failure (e.g., pollution), and benefits and costs of government intervention.

ECON 202U Macroeconomics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of inflation, unemployment, GDP determination, money supply, balance of payments, currency markets, role of fiscal and monetary policies.

ECON 285U Teacher Summer Economics Institute
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey course designed to introduce classroom educators to the field of economics and economic thought. Introduction to both micro and macro principles, and the economic way of thinking. Topics include discussions on scarcity, supply and demand, economic growth, specialization and economic cooperation, interdependence and trade, employment and unemployment, prices, inflation and deflation, competitiveness and productivity, money and banking, and monetary policy. Instruction will also include hands-on sessions to allow participants to learn how to integrate economics into their classroom instruction.

ECON 377U Principles of Economics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey course which introduces students to the general economic principles that guide the nation's economy and influences HRM. Topics will include such things as inflation, exchange rates, consumer price index, and supply and demand. Focus will be placed on how economic variables influence such things as supply of labor, compensation, recruitment, and retention.

ECON 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ECON 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ECON 507U Labor Economics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey course that introduces students to the general economic principles that guide the nation's economy and influences HRM. Topics will include such things as inflation, exchange rates, consumer price index, and supply and demand. Focus will placed on how economic variables influence such things as supply of labor, compensation, recruitment, and retention.

ECON 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ECON 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ENGL 101U Strategic Reading and Writing
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on critical reading and writing, providing instruction in grammar and mechanics, organizational and paragraph development skills, rhetorical techniques, and basic research. It will provide a collaborative environment in which students will employ a range of comprehension strategies to a variety of assigned texts, and it will encourage students to approach writing as a process by requiring prewriting, editing, and revision. It will also introduce basic research skills.

ENGL 201U Critical Writing and Research I
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on academic writing, critical reading, and research. Throughout the semester, it will require students to write on a range of topics for a variety of purposes and audiences, emphasizing writing as a process. It will also introduce a broad array of texts that are intended to improve students' critical reading skills. Finally, it will include training in research and proper methods of documentation.
Prerequisites
Satisfactory ACCUPLACER score or completion of ENGL 101U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ENGL 202U Critical Writing and Research II
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on academic writing, critical reading, and research, building on the skills developed in ENGL 201U. Throughout the semester, it will require students to write essays of varying length and purpose, culminating in a research-driven persuasive essay. It will also introduce a broad array of cultural texts that are intended to improve students' critical reading and analytical skills. Finally, it will include additional training in research and documentation.
Prerequisites
Completion of ENGL 201U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ENGL 203U Research Process
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course will cover the process of researching and writing a documented argument paper. Topics covered will include forming a strategy, learning the library's resources, incorporating evidence, avoiding plagiarism and writing correct citations.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U and ENGL 202U

ENGL 222U Short Fiction
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of short story from various critical perspectives.

ENGL 229U The Modern Novel
Semester hours: 3
Description
Selected works of 20th century including modern novelists' treatment of family life, rejection of traditional values, sense of alienation, and attempt of artist to create his or her own vision of modern world.

ENGL 325U All the World's A Stage
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of Shakespeare's development as playwright through reading and analysis of selected comedies, histories, and tragedies.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 326U Shakespeare and Film I
Semester hours: 3
Description
Students will read Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night's Dream and analyze alternative film versions of the plays.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 327U Shakespeare and Film II
Semester hours: 3
Description
Students will read Shakespearean drama, screen alternative film approaches to the plays, explore film analysis techniques and work in groups on a film project.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 331U Twentieth-Century American Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
Development of literary form and thought from American experience.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 332U The American Short Story
Semester hours: 3
Description
Students will read selected short stories by American writers including, among others: Hawthorne, Poe, Twain, Gilman, Wharton, London, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hughes, Hurston, Bradbury, Walker, Silko, and Leavitt. Through these readings both the development of the short story and the unfolding of the social and cultural history of our country will be examined.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 336U Selected Works of Tennessee Williams
Semester hours: 3
Description
Readings and analysis of selected major plays by Tennessee Williams and a comparative study of the plays adapted into screenplays and film.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 337U Southern Drama
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study and comparative analysis of plays and films set in South, written by Southerners. Focus on William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, Carson McCullers, Beth Henley, and Robert Harling.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 338U Biblical Themes in Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines selected texts from Paradise Lost to the modern novel.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 340U Black Women Writers
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of literary careers of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker and Toni Morrison.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 342U The Family in Fiction
Semester hours: 3
Description
Students explore representation of family life from variety of genres and literacy periods.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 343U Science Fiction
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines selected representational and exceptional works of science fiction and considers its major categories and subgenres.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 344U Major Themes in Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of fiction, poetry and drama with emphasis on basic literary themes of innocence and experiences, conformity and rebellion, love and hate, and presence of death.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 345U Gothic Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of Gothic classics and their connection to gender politics, depth psychology, and the anti-realistic character of both romantic and modernist writings.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 346U Banned Books
Semester hours: 3
Description
For centuries, works of literature have been banned for political, social, sexual, and religious reasons. This course will examine some important and familiar works of literature that have been banned, and sometimes even burned, with a goal of understanding how book banning and burning can happen and their impact on societies.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 347U Edgar Allan Poe
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the work of a writer who, although one of the remarkable rationalists of his time, has become a popular symbol of the deranged and depraved. Focuses on Poe's fiction, poetry, and criticism and explores roots of Poe's art, as well as the interplay between rational and irrational forces in that art. Central questions: Within the world of a given Poe tale or poem, which things actually exist and which things are only illusions? Within Poe's created worlds, what are the true sources of knowledge? What can be known with certainty? What must be doubted and why?
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 348U The Legend of King Arthur
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines evolution of the legend from medieval times to present, with special emphasis on Malory, Tennyson, and the modern novel.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 349U Tracking Contemporary Trickster
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines archetypal tricksters in literature, mythology, and cultural history in an effort to identify contemporary tricksters. Begins study with Hermes, Eshu, Coyote and more, then shifts to identifying potential contemporary tricksters from across the globe. Analysis of old media, like texts and the oral tradition, and new media, like film and social media, fleshes out characteristics of the trickster archetype as it applies to the modern age.
Prerequisites
ADED 301U or ENGL 203U

ENGL 354U The Global Short Story
Semester hours: 3
Description
Covers the short story in a global context, examining the ways authors from a variety of eras and cultures have approached short fiction. From the dark romanticism of Hawthorne to the magical realism of Marquez - and many stops in between - the course features works with a broad range of themes, styles, and techniques, all to demonstrate the ways that short fiction has been a unique laboratory for literary experimentation and innovation. The course places an emphasis on class discussion.
Prerequisites
ADED 301U or ENGL 203U

ENGL 360U Women of the Bible
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Bible presents many cases in which women took active roles in the history of Ancient Israel, which is often regarded as having been a repressive social and political environment for women. The course will examine how women of the Bible transcended the traditional roles of wives, mothers, and daughters. Students will examine the depiction of women in the Old and New testaments, and how they have contributed to gender construction in western religion and society.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 368U Creative Writing: Fiction
Semester hours: 3
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 369U Creative Writing: Poetry
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines characteristics and functions of artistic invention and poetic form through analysis of literary models and students' own poetry.
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 538U Biblical Themes in Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines selected texts from Paradise Lost to the modern novel.

ENGL 547U Edgar Allan Poe
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the work of a writer who, although one of the remarkable rationalists of his time, has become a popular symbol of the deranged and depraved. Focuses on Poe's fiction, poetry, and criticism and explores roots of Poe's art, as well as the interplay between rational and irrational forces in that art. Central questions: Within the world of a given Poe tale or poem, which things actually exist and which things are only illusions? Within Poe's created worlds, what are the true sources of knowledge? What can be known with certainty? What must be doubted and why?

ENGL 554U The Global Short Story
Semester hours: 3
Description
Covers the short story in a global context, examining the ways authors from a variety of eras and cultures have approached short fiction. From the dark romanticism of Hawthorne to the magical realism of Marquez - and many stops in between - the course features works with a broad range of themes, styles, and techniques, all to demonstrate the ways that short fiction has been a unique laboratory for literary experimentation and innovation. The course places an emphasis on class discussion.

ENGL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ENGL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

FIN 360U Financial Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
The foundations and tools of finance, including examination of financial markets, investments, and financial management in large corporations, small businesses, and personal financial planning.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U or higher, and ACCT 301U or equivalent preparation in financial accounting are required. Statistics course also recommended; may be taken concurrently.

FIN 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

FIN 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

FREN 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOG 201U World Geography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of world by regions, with emphasis on cultural differences among nations.

GEOG 202U Introduction to Geo-Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Current and emerging issues at the confluence of geography and international relations are examined. Emphasis on areas in transition or which pose a threat to global peace. Issues covered are globalization, terrorism, fundamentalism, multi-lateral organizations, modern warfare, economic development, and cultural and ethnic conflict.

GEOG 215U Urban Geography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Global pattern of increased urbanization and the features and structure of selected major cities are examined. Contrasts differences between cities in richer vs. poorer countries. Issues may include: overcrowding, slums and urban poverty, mass transportation, traffic congestion, segregation, environmental problems, culture, urban planning, gentrification, and urban sprawl.

GEOG 299U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOG 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 320U The Geology of Disaster
Semester hours: 3
Description
On completing this course, students will have a clear overview of how basic geological principles may be applied to help predict the occurrence and impact of natural disasters. Students will be encouraged to consider the application of basic scientific principles to earth science. Exploration of the impact of the earth's varied internal processes will give students a new perspective on environmental change and human evolution.

GEOL 321U Volcanology
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is an introduction to the fascinating topic of volcanoes. Students will study the origins, ascent, crystallization, emplacement, and eruption of molten rock (magma) and the impact of volcanic activity on earth resources, the environment, and civilization.

GEOL 322U The Global Impact of Climate Change
Semester hours: 3
Description
Recent climate change and concern about global warming has been described as a threat to global security by some and as a great hoax by others. This course takes a dispassionate look at the evidence for climate change and considers the charge that manmade greenhouse gas emissions are to blame. First, students will review the evidence for global warming and climate change. Then they will explore the science behind climate change and investigate the impact of global warming around the world. Students will contrast the development of climate change policy in the United States, United Nations, Europe, and the developing world, and identify some of the economic and ethical issues involved. Next, they will use their knowledge to suggest changes in energy policy that could help mitigate the worst impacts of climate change and then finally recommend how society can adapt to climate change in the future.

GEOL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 522U Global Impact of Climate Change
Semester hours: 3
Description
Rapid climate change is causing an increase in the temperature of the atmosphere and oceans. This is a truly global problem that requires international research and collaboration to resolve. The USA is a major producer of the atmospheric "greenhouse" gases that make a significant contribution to this global "anthropogenic" warming. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the global environmental impact of anthropogenic climate change, and to challenge students to think about the possible impact of the way we live in the USA on poor, marginalized and at risk communities around the world.

GEOL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GSCI 301U The Role of Science and Technology in Shaping the Modern Era
Semester hours: 6
Description
The opportunities and perils of scientific inquiry.

GSCI 302U Great Ideas in Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed for non-science majors. The non-technical course integrates and focuses on major events of biology, chemistry, and physics that have shaped the course of science through the centuries. The idea behind each major advance is treated in its historic context, with special attention to its importance in mankind's understanding of the nature of the universe. Everyday examples will be incorporated in the course to help students understand the relationship between individuals and the natural world.

GSCI 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

GSCI 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HCA 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

HIST 300U Women and the American Experience
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of unique experience of women in history of U.S. from colonial times to present; attitudes held by and toward them; varied roles they have played in nation's development.

HIST 301U Women in European Civilization
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth study of place of women in European civilization and how ideas, institutions and practices of civilization determined and/or changed that place.

HIST 305U Richmond Across the Centuries
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of history of city of Richmond as it developed between 1660 and 1960.

HIST 308U Social and Cultural History of Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Women
Semester hours: 3
Description
Place and role of women in family, religion, education, reform movements, entertainment, literature and the arts. Impact of institution of slavery in women's lives. Particular attention given to work of women writers and artists in their historic context.

HIST 310U An Age of Giants
Semester hours: 3
Description
Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Marshall, Hamilton, and Franklin as representative of their age and its ideas and their roles in shaping a new nation. Topical approach includes such issues as structure of society, women, slavery, the Constitution, and development of political parties.

HIST 312U Great Issues in American History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introductory course explores three central issues in American history: revolution and formation of constitutional government, causes of Civil War and process of Reconstruction; and rise of United States to role of world power.

HIST 315U Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S.: 1861 to the Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
Certain terrible catastrophes/disasters that America has suffered from 1861 to the present have had particularly strong influences on the nation. This course examines several such events, their impact, and how and why that impact took shape as it did. The role of presentation of the disasters through media, literature, government action, and especially the arts will be analyzed.

HIST 316U The New South
Semester hours: 3
Description
Growth of New South from Reconstruction to present. Examines life in South under Reconstruction, economic, social, and political developments that created New South. Race relations, Jim Crow laws, segregation, civil rights and integration examined historically as well as the changing role of women. Works of Southern writers examined as sources of norms and values and as agents for changing them.

HIST 317U The Old South
Semester hours: 3
Description
Historical examination of South from colonial days through Civil War. The Southern family, role of women, importance of religion in region, literature, arts, and architecture as both expression of values and tastes and as agent to form them. Political life. Development and impact of slavery.

HIST 320U Virginia History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Social, cultural, and political history of Virginia from Colonial period to present.

HIST 321U Moments in Time I: World History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Using important events in world history, the course explores both content and method of historical study. Generally following the underlying teaching principle of the public radio program 'A Moment in Time' allows students to examine events in their historical context and take first steps toward becoming historians.

HIST 322U Moments in Time II: History of the Americas
Semester hours: 3
Description
Using important events in the history of the Americas, the course explores both content and method of historical study. Generally following the underlying teaching principle of the public radio program 'A Moment in Time' allows students to examine significant events in the Americas in their historical context.

HIST 323U Westward Ho!
Semester hours: 3
Description
Forging westward was part of American experience from colonial times. Examines causes, course, and results of drive West through events and developments including Lewis & Clark's Expedition, Manifest Destiny, Gold Rush, railway building, and conflict with Indian tribes. Popular literature on West and classic Westerns used to assess commonly held views of Americans on the Great West.

HIST 324U Women and the American West
Semester hours: 3
Description
American Women - White, Native American, Black, Hispanic, and Asian - played important and varied roles in the settlement and development of the American west. Women and the American West examines and assesses their lives, influences, and contributions - especially during the second half of the 19th century - in the larger context of the history of the American west.

HIST 327U Belles, Steel Magnolias and Good Ol' Gals
Semester hours: 3
Description
The history of Southern women from the colonial period to the present. Understanding class differences and regional differences within the south, the institution of slavery and its impact on the lives of all southern women, the Civil War, emancipation, Reconstruction, and modern issues of race, class, and gender that uniquely affect southern women are among the topics to be examined.

HIST 328U Southern Women's Civil War
Semester hours: 3
Description
Southern Women's Civil War is designed to examine what in their pre-war lives shaped the views of southern women - white and black, free and slave - on slavery, secession, and the war; some of the many ways in which those women experienced the Civil War years; and something of the impact of the war and its outcome on their post-war lives.

HIST 329U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

HIST 330U Road to the Presidency
Semester hours: 3
Description
The process of selecting an American president provides a window through which one can explore the political, social, cultural, and economic climate of the nation. By studying how the process was constructed and how that process has changed over time, in the context of specific noteworthy elections, memorable elements of the electoral process that have impacted presidential elections becomes apparent.

HIST 337U Tudor England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Political, institutional, social, and cultural study emphasizing reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.

HIST 338U Stuart England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Emphasis on conflict between Stuarts and Parliament. Cromwell and the Civil War, the Restoration and Revolutionary settlement.

HIST 345U The History of Ideas
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring the intellectual development within the western tradition.

HIST 347U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of life and times of Thomas Jefferson including historical perspective of him as statesman, politician, and writer as well as study of him as architect and planner. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

HIST 360U Victorian England: Whistler, Ruskin and the Nature of Truth
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on opposing concepts of truth in Victorian England as exemplified and espoused by two major cultural figures of the time, John Ruskin and James McNeill Whistler.

HIST 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HIST 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HIST 515U Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S.: 1861 to the Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
Certain terrible catastrophes/disasters that America has suffered from 1861 to the present have had particularly strong influences on the nation. This course examines several such events, their impact, and how and why that impact took shape as it did. The role of presentation of the disasters through media, literature, government action, and especially the arts will be analyzed.

HIST 522U Moments in Time II: History of the Americas
Semester hours: 3
Description
Using important events in the history of the Americas, the course explores both content and method of historical study. Generally following the underlying teaching principle of the public radio program 'A Moment in Time' allows students to examine significant events in the Americas in their historical context.

HIST 529U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

HIST 537U Tudor England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Political, institutional, social and cultural study emphasizing the reigns of Henry VII and Elizabeth I.

HIST 538U Stuart England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Emphasis on conflict between Stuarts and Parliament, Cromwell and the Civil War, the Restoration and Revolutionary settlement.

HIST 547U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of the life and times of Thomas Jefferson, including historical perspective of Jefferson as statesman, politician, writer, architect and planner. Use of primary sources is emphasized in the course. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

HIST 548U Questions of Conscience: Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide
Semester hours: 3
Description
The course is designed to educate middle and high school teachers in Holocaust and genocide. It provides excellent tools necessary to teach such sensitive subjects to students. The course addresses many sections of the Virginia Standards of Learning for history, English, civics, economics, biology, art and music. Teachers will have the opportunity to delve into a wider range of topics, from the History of anti-Semitism, the Rise of Hitler and the Nazis, to Defining Genocide in the Contemporary Era.

HIST 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HIST 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 201U Introduction to Iconology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introductory approach to understanding symbols, allusions, and metaphors in art and literature.
Prerequisites
ENGL 100U & ENGL 101U or ENGL 201U, 202U & 203U.

HUM 202U The World of Enchantment: Legends, Romances, and Tales
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of folklore from many lands, from medieval romances to popular worlds of J.R.R. Tolkein and C.S. Lewis.

HUM 300U Applied Ethics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of ethical choices, omissions, dilemmas and crises faced by individuals and organizations in the nonprofit, government, corporate, media, technology, environmental, and sports sectors. Use of ethics theories and the law as a framework to analyze case studies. This course will foster skills in ethical reasoning by encouraging students to analyze critically the consequences of individual and collective actions.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U

HUM 301U Intimate Relationships
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic concepts and ideas in marriage and family to help students understand better their individual attitudes, behavior, socialization experiences, and present and future life options as they relate to their particular families and general social order.

HUM 311U Advanced Iconology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Further investigate signs, symbols, metaphors and allusions that pervade Western culture. Integrates class readings and independent research.

HUM 313U Career and Life Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of adult development and career topics to help students better understand how to successfully plan their lives. Focuses on stages of adulthood and transitions, skills assessments, career management strategies, life balance, and goal setting.

HUM 346U The History of Human Expression
Semester hours: 6
Description
Examination of the arts in their wide variety: visual, literary, plastic and melodic.

HUM 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 301U The Realm of Ideas I: Context and Chronology
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to selected major ideas in ancient and modern world history, including philosophies, systems of belief, political ideologies, and concepts of social order; institutions through which the ideas have been manifested and implemented; methodologies used in the academic disciplines examined.

IDST 302U The Realm of Ideas II: Self, Society and Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction for liberal arts majors to important ideas in selected modern natural and social sciences, and methodologies used in their study and application.

IDST 303U The Realm of Ideas III: Human Expression
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction for Liberal Arts majors to important themes in selected significant movements in world literatures and arts; the methodologies used in their study and application.

IDST 304U Understanding Culture and Language I
Semester hours: 3
Description
Understanding Language and Culture I is designed to offer students an examination of the importance of language as the most critical component of a peoples' common culture and the key to understanding it. In the context of our pluralistic American society and the rapid globalization taking place in today's world such understanding of the relationship between language and the perspectives, practices, and products of cultures is increasingly important politically, economically, and socially.

IDST 305U Understanding Culture and Language II
Semester hours: 3
Description
Understanding Language and Culture II is designed to offer students an examination of the importance of language as the most critical component of a peoples' common culture and the key to understanding it. In the context of our pluralistic American society and the rapid globalization taking place in today's world such understanding of the relationship between language and the perspectives, practices, and products of cultures is increasingly important politically, economically, and socially.

IDST 306U Understanding Culture and Language
Semester hours: 6
Description
Understanding Language and Culture is designed to offer students an examination of the importance of language as the most critical component of a peoples' common culture and the key to understanding it. In the context of our pluralistic American society and the rapid globalization taking place in today's world such understanding of the relationship between language and the perspectives, practices, and products of cultures is increasingly important politically, economically, and socially.

IDST 310U The Examined Life
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring human behavior and the uniqueness of the human condition.

IDST 395U The Realm of Ideas IV: Capstone Seminar for Liberal Arts Majors
Semester hours: 3
Description
The capstone seminar for the Liberal Arts major: The culminating academic experience for liberal arts majors; emphasis on demonstrating through a substantive paper understanding of the connections among the liberal arts; also emphasis on relevant experiential learning opportunities.
Prerequisites
IDST 303U

IDST 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 495U Capstone Course: Senior Seminar
Semester hours: 6
Description
Capstone course for Weekend College.

IDST 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ISTY 149U International Studies/Global Economics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on providing an overview of basic economic principles and their application to analyzing the world's economic order.
Prerequisites
By special admission only.

ISTY 249U International Studies/Global Economics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces student to world of international studies and global economics. Covers such factors as U.S. and foreign trade policies, sociocultural factors, international marketing, and impact of international trade on domestic economy.

ISTY 301U Understanding the Global Village
Semester hours: 6
Description
Interdisciplinary course focusing on the trends in an increasingly interdependent yet fragmented world.

ISTY 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

JOUR 205U Photojournalism
Semester hours: 3
Description
Theory and practice of news and feature photography, darkroom technique, and properties of light and film.
Prerequisites
Student must have a 35mm single lens reflex camera.

JOUR 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

LDSP 200U Introduction to Leadership Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to history and theory of leadership, to critical thinking and methods of inquiry as they bear on subject of leadership, to ethics of leadership, to basic leadership competencies, to relevant leadership contexts, and to leading groups and individuals.

LDSP 278U Communication in Leadership
Semester hours: 3
Description
Applied course to aid in the personal development of listening, writing, and speaking skills. Examination of leadership communication in organizational, group, and public contexts. Students will analyze their personal leadership styles and develop leadership communication skills through team projects and classroom exercises.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 302U Leadership and Ethical Action and the Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines current ethical issues such as privacy, legal dilemmas, work place ethics, and trends in corporate and governmental ethics. Applied ethics course where students will attempt to resolve ethical dilemmas faced by leaders in specific situations common to various work place environments. Focus on understanding ethical meanings, contexts, paradigms, and models associated with executive decision making. Emphasizes critical thinking, and oral and written communication skills as students read, analyze, debate in small groups, and make formal presentations.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 310U Leadership and Ethical Decision Making
Semester hours: 6
Description
Role of leader in commerce and service is examined.

LDSP 348U Leadership, Conflict Management and Group Dynamics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the factors that contribute to the performance of effective groups. This includes exploring the kinds of interactions and human experiences typical in organizations and groups, how those interactions and experiences can facilitate achieving collective ends, and how they can impede accomplishing those ends. In addition, the causes of conflict and conflict-resolution strategies are covered via experiential exercises and research projects.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 358U Historical Perspective of Leadership
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analyzes leadership through the centuries by examining well-known leaders throughout history. Discusses the evolution of leadership thought through the ages. In addition, the role of long-term social, political, economic forces will be examined. Emphasis will be on application to actual leaders within their respective contexts.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 368U Leadership in the Global Environment
Semester hours: 3
Description
Explores leadership within a global context weighing issues such as culture, laws, language, and other differences. This course provides practical insights into leadership in the global environment. Topics covered include an analysis of global leading across cultures in modern societies.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U

LDSP 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

LDSP 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

LDSP 478U Strategic Thinking for Leaders
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides the necessary skills for the individual to begin thinking more strategically about their respective industries. This course provides an understanding of how strategic thinking relates to design, planning and implementation of strategies and tactics meant to accomplish the organization's goals and objectives.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 499U Post-Baccalaureate Practicum
Semester hours: 1
Description
This practicum is an integrated directed study in the subject of the certificate program. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will explore a common theme present in three or more of their courses through preparation of either a professionally significant project or a major paper suitable for professional use under the supervision of a faculty member.

MATH 103U Finite Mathematics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Logical thinking and problem-solving using sets, logic, numeration and mathematical systems, real number system, algebra, counting methods.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent

MATH 140U Algebra with Applications
Semester hours: 3
Description
Sets, functions, exponents, logarithms, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, inequalities, binomial theorems, sequences, series, complex numbers and linear programming.
Prerequisites
Departmental approval required.

MATH 150U Pre-calculus and Trigonometry
Semester hours: 3
Description
Concepts and applications of algebra and trigonometry. Topics include graphics, transformations and inverses of functions, linear, exponential, logarithmic, power, polynomial, rational and trigonometric functions.
Prerequisites
College algebra or departmental permission.

MATH 265U Applied Statistics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Fundamentals of statistical methods supporting data analysis for decision-making in social sciences, life sciences, and business. Descriptive statistics measuring central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling distributions and statistical inference, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U or higher recommended.

MATH 270U Applied Calculus
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course content includes limits, continuity, differentiation, partial differentiation and integration of single and multi-variable functions with applications to managerial, life and social sciences.
Prerequisites
Pre-calculus or permission of the instructor.

MATH 300U Critical Thinking and Analysis
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of quantitative and qualitative data for decision-making in the business, law, governmental, and non-profit sectors. Application of common algebra, statistics, and basic calculus to solve common classes of problems.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U, Finite Mathematics, or college algebra or higher.

MATH 307U Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course introduces the skills needed in order to analyze data pertaining to the HRM field such as retention patterns, compensation differences, performance measurements, etc. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics as well as regression and analysis of variance. Focus will be placed on finding answers to HRM questions and problems using a quantitative approach.

MATH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MATH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MGMT 341U Principles of Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Fundamentals of management emphasizing application of scientific methods to solution of business problems; illustrations from various types of organizations, including manufacturing and service industries, government, charitable, and other social institutions.

MGMT 342U Managing Business Processes
Semester hours: 4
Description
Analysis, design, control, and improvement of business processes producing goods and services in business, legal, government, and non-profit organizations. Quantitative metrics and models to analyze operations, plan capacity, manage bottlenecks, and improve process flow rates for improved financial results. Cases and problems in process analysis, statistical process control, inventory, waiting lines, lean operations.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U (finite math) or higher.

MGMT 345U Business Literacy
Semester hours: 6
Description
Providing an overview of the issues facing those involved in domestic and international commerce.

MGMT 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MGMT 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MKT 321U Marketing
Semester hours: 3
Description
Activities by which the planning and exchange of ideas, goods, and services are explained from inception to final consumption. Analysis of markets and their environments, development of marketing strategy, evaluation and control of marketing programs.

MKT 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MLA 500U Methods and Themes in Liberal Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
This core course will provide an overview of modes of inquiry, analysis and research particular to at least two of the following fields of study: Historical Studies, Literary Studies, Social Analysis, and the Visual and Performing Arts. A special theme (which may vary from term to term) will provide focus for the practical application of these methodologies. It will also emphasize writing skills, relevant computer technologies and library use. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated, with the approval of the Coordinator, for credit.

MLA 506U Humanities Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the humanities. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

MLA 507U Social Sciences Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the social sciences. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

MLA 508U Science Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in science. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

MLA 510U Great Trials in American History
Semester hours: 3
Description
This class investigates the great trials of the American judicial system in an effort to explore the emergence of the current justice system, including the development of trial record keeping, strategy and skills; the effect of the contemporary culture on the outcome of trial proceedings; and the divisive impact of some trials on the population of the United States. We will observe the impact of child testimony, media influence, jury bias, political influence and religious beliefs in the courtroom. The course will also consider the great orators in American law and their influence on trial outcomes and the development of the justice system.

MLA 550U History of IT
Semester hours: 3
Description
The study of information technology from its earliest origins to present-day computer-based information technology systems. The types and evolution of methods of conveying information in all its forms will be covered. Lectures and group discussions will be used to provide opportunities for students to present their discoveries of various aspects of information technology from an historical perspective.

MLA 570U Independent Research
Semester hours: 1-3

MLA 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MLA 599U Seminar in Liberal Arts
Semester hours: 3
Description
Discussion of selected readings designed to assist student's drawing meaningful closure to the MLA program. Each student will develop a final project growing out of theme, interest or topic that has served to integrate student's program. Sharing of preparation and results of the projects will be an essential component of the course.

MUS 111U Appreciation of Music
Semester hours: 3
Description
For general student. Introduction to listening; present-day repertory and its historical development.

MUS 310U Managing Performing Arts Organizations
Semester hours: 3
Description
Reviews topics essential for successful management of performing arts organizations. Studies will include organizational structure, budget development and management, strategic planning, trustee development, trustee/staff relations, marketing, audience development, development of outreach programming, box-office management, mailing list and membership management, human resource management, union labor relations and contract negotiation.

MUS 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MUS 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MUS 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MUS 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PBAD 338U Decision Making in Public Administration
Semester hours: 3
Description
Assists student to recognize decision-making process in public management/administration and to develop techniques to ensure timely decisions with accountability for action. Emphasis on determining methods of controlling administrative decisions within an organization while fostering atmosphere that allows decision making at appropriate level of organization.

PBAD 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PBAD 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PBRL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PBRL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIL 302U Thinking About the Paranormal
Semester hours: 3
Description
A recent Gallup Poll shows that about three in four Americans hold some paranormal belief - in at least one of the following: extrasensory perception, haunted houses, ghosts, mental telepathy, clairvoyance, astrology, communicating with the dead, witches, reincarnation, and channeling. How reasonable are these beliefs? Can they be supported or discounted via modern science or are they purely a matter of faith or personal opinion? What makes one belief or explanation more reasonable than another? Is it immoral to hold beliefs that are not supported by strong evidence? This course examines these and other questions.

PHIL 303U Beyond Death
Semester hours: 3
Description
Is there any evidence to support claims of life after death? This course will begin with a critical examination of some of the purported evidence, based on claims of: Reincarnation, Mediumship, and Near Death Experiences. Philosophical underpinnings of the question will also be studied: What could count as evidence of life after death? What specifically about ourselves do we believe (or want to believe) survives death? What is a human soul? Finally, an examination of the psychological and moral implications of the belief in life after death will be made: Is it necessary or helpful for alleviating anxiety concerning death? Is there anything morally wrong with maintaining beliefs that are not supported by empirical evidence? Is belief in immortality necessary for a meaningful life?

PHIL 304U Asian Philosophy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces some of the methods, issues, and theories associated with major Asian philosophical religious systems, focusing on Hinduism, Early Buddhism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism. Addresses issues such as the nature of the sacred; the relationship between the Sacred and the self, life and death, happiness and meaning; and morality. Compares and contrasts approaches and answers to these issues between these traditions, as well as between these systems and "Western" philosophy and religion.

PHIL 305U The Problem of Evil
Semester hours: 3
Description
Traditionally in western philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil (or suffering) in the world with the existence of an omniscient (all-knowing), omnipotent (all-powerful) and omnibenevolent (all-good) God. Proponents of the problem assert: if God exists and has all these attributes, then there would be no evil; yet evil (i.e., tremendous suffering) clearly exists. In this course, we will examine various versions of this problem as well as various traditional and contemporary responses to it. Moreover, since the problem of reconciling evil/suffering with a conception of "the Sacred" extends beyond monotheism, we will also examine approaches to this general and deep problem from other major world religions.

PHIL 306U Religion and Science: Examining Big Questions
Semester hours: 3
Description
Throughout history, humans have appealed to religion to understand the universe and our place in it. In the eyes of many, modern science has taken over this role. But, are science and religion locked in a mortal struggle, or are they completely separate domains of the human experience, or are there actually points of concordance between the two? This course examines the relationship between religion and science, exploring the apparent conflicts in their methodologies and answers to life's biggest questions, including: the origin of everything, the nature of the self, the prospects of life after death, the existence of nature of the "Sacred," the foundation of morals, the essence of a "meaningful life," and the role of faith and reason in our lives.

PHIL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIL 502U Thinking About the Paranormal
Semester hours: 3
Description
A recent Gallup Poll shows that about three in four Americans hold some paranormal belief - in at least one of the following: extrasensory perception, haunted houses, ghosts, mental telepathy, clairvoyance, astrology, communicating with the dead, witches, reincarnation, and channeling. How reasonable are these beliefs? Can they be supported or discounted via modern science or are they purely a matter of faith or personal opinion? What makes one belief or explanation more reasonable than another? Is it immoral to hold beliefs that are not supported by strong evidence? This course examines these and other questions.

PHIL 503U Beyond Death
Semester hours: 3
Description
Is there any evidence to support claims of life after death? This course will begin with a critical examination of some of the purported evidence, based on claims of: Reincarnation, Mediumship, and Near Death Experiences. Philosophical underpinnings of the question will also be studied: What could count as evidence of life after death? What specifically about ourselves do we believe (or want to believe) survives death? What is a human soul? Finally, an examination of the psychological and moral implications of the belief in life after death will be made: Is it necessary or helpful for alleviating anxiety concerning death? Is there anything morally wrong with maintaining beliefs that are not supported by empirical evidence? Is belief in immortality necessary for a meaningful life?

PHIL 504U Asian Philosophy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces some of the methods, issues, and theories associated with major Asian philosophical religious systems, focusing on Hinduism, Early Buddhism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism. Addresses issues such as the nature of the sacred; the relationship between the Sacred and the self, life and death, happiness and meaning; and morality. Compares and contrasts approaches and answers to these issues between these traditions, as well as between these systems and "Western" philosophy and religion.

PHIL 505U The Problem of Evil
Semester hours: 3
Description
Traditionally in western philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil (or suffering) in the world with the existence of an omniscient (all-knowing), omnipotent (all-powerful) and omnibenevolent (all-good) God. Proponents of the problem assert: if God exists and has all these attributes, then there would be no evil; yet evil (i.e., tremendous suffering) clearly exists. In this course, we will examine various versions of this problem as well as various traditional and contemporary responses to it. Moreover, since the problem of reconciling evil/suffering with a conception of "the Sacred" extends beyond monotheism, we will also examine approaches to this general and deep problem from other major world religions.

PHIL 506U Religion and Science: Examining Big Questions
Semester hours: 3
Description
Throughout history, humans have appealed to religion to understand the universe and our place in it. In the eyes of many, modern science has taken over this role. But, are science and religion locked in a mortal struggle, or are they completely separate domains of the human experience, or are there actually points of concordance between the two? This course examines the relationship between religion and science, exploring the apparent conflicts in their methodologies and answers to life's biggest questions, including: the origin of everything, the nature of the self, the prospects of life after death, the existence of nature of the "Sacred," the foundation of morals, the essence of a "meaningful life," and the role of faith and reason in our lives.

PHIL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PHYS 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-3

PLSC 205U Introduction to American Government
Semester hours: 3
Description
A multimedia, high-tech approach to the study of basic roles, structures, and functions of American political institutions; and introduction to American political process.

PLSC 207U Virginia Government and Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A multimedia, high-tech approach to the study of Virginia government at state, county, municipal, and special district levels emphasizing legislative, executive, and judicial organization; and state politics and intergovernmental relations.

PLSC 301U The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring the history and importance of civic participation in the American tradition. Service learning component.

PLSC 302U Modern Conservative Political Theory
Semester hours: 3
Description
An examination of the concepts of modern conservative political philosophy, their importance and influence.

PLSC 303U Metropolitan Problems and Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of and practical involvement with major issues affecting metropolitan governments.

PLSC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PLSC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PLSC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PLSC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PSYC 101U Introductory Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Scientific principles of behavior. Survey emphasizing psychological methods and research involved in understanding human behavior.

PSYC 190U Child Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to biological, social, cognitive, and emotional processes of development during prenatal to preadolescent developmental periods.

PSYC 222U Motivation and Emotion
Semester hours: 3
Description
Explanations of behavior and its likelihood of occurrence as well as physiological, cognitive, and social-interactive responses that have tendency to facilitate or obstruct that behavior.

PSYC 230U Psychology of Women
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of gender as function of biological and environmental forces. Emphasis on traditional and modern roles, developmental patterns of women, and psychological problems unique to women.

PSYC 302U Psychology of Terrorism
Semester hours: 3
Description
In the past decade, terrorism has emerged as a dynamic force dramatically impacting individuals and social systems. During this course we will review the history of terrorism, seek to understand the radicalization of terrorists, investigate the immediate and long-term reactions to acts of terrorism and explore the social and psychological implications of the war on terrorism.

PSYC 303U Psychology of Gender
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of current theory and empirical research on gender, exploring origins of gender identity and impact of gender on systems, individuals, attitudes, and behavior.

PSYC 304U Psychology of Relationships
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course in social psychology is designed as an overview of the fundamental areas of the psychology of intimate and non-intimate relationships between people and the effects of these relationships on them. How and why are interpersonal relationships formed? What effects do they have on us? What do individuals do to relationships? Such questions will be explored in the course.

PSYC 305U Stress and Its Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Physiological and psychological aspects of stressors and the stress response. Review of principles, research, and methods of stress management.

PSYC 306U Benign Bigotry: Psychology of Subtle Prejudice
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on social problems concerning diversity and prejudices in today's society. Topics range from racism to gay rights, paying special attention to hostility, bigotry, and prejudice. Explores the feminist movement, racism, and the "neutrality zone," and zeroes in on perceptions of underground prejudice and internal conflicts. Differentiates between societal beliefs and misconceptions that contribute to human behaviors. Investigation includes current research and problems and challenges in today's society.

PSYC 307U Psychology of Faith
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of reflections in faith, personal behavior, and social well-being. Topics include questions that college students encounter in basic psychology class. Is there a connection with faith psychology and other issues that have been taught? This class offers information concerning recent research within the major areas of psychological science and with the values of society. Investigations will be about the ideas of human nature and individual learning. Course will investigate behavior and attitudes and will look at science and spiritually. It will also identify major insights regarding human behavior and attitudes about positive belief systems and their individual intuition concerning their approach.

PSYC 308U Psychology of Intuitive Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Intuition has remained an emerging cloud of mystery for centuries. Whether you have read about intuition from the earliest philosophers or the views of psychologists, it has still remained important in everyday decision making. If it is a gut feeling, a hunch or an inner knowing that can¿t be explained, this study of the intuitive ability encompasses intelligence and is being recognized as a perception within the body¿s psycho-physiological system. The psychology of intuitive development demonstrates the subconscious, or "heart intelligence" that can be cultivated and is essential for success in decision making, sensory and analytic process.

PSYC 313U Social Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Critical overview of current theory and research in social psychology, with emphasis on conceptual and empirical work on social cognition, social influence, affective processes, attraction, altruism, aggression, and group dynamics.

PSYC 327U Organizational Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of industrial/organizational theories and psychological principles as applied to the workplace. Will examine job analysis, the screening, selection, training and development of employees, the performance appraisal process, motivation and job satisfaction, stress, leadership, and organizational development.

PSYC 336U Human Growth and Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a foundation in the study of human growth and development. Theory and research related to education, human development and counseling will be examined. A strong emphasis will be placed on the adolescent period of development and the psychological, emotional, physical and social changes that occur. The goal for students is to examine ways in which research in human development contributes to an understanding of their field of study.

PSYC 337U Psychological Development Across the Life Cycle
Semester hours: 3
Description
Developmental changes and psycho-biosocial processes from adolescent through adult life.

PSYC 338U Forensic Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Forensic Psychology is designed to give students an understanding of the interaction between our legal system and psychology. Roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists will be examined. Topics covered will include criminal profiling with a focus on serial killers; the insanity defense; criminal competencies; child custody cases; eyewitness and expert testimonies; civil commitment for dangerous offenders; and victimization.

PSYC 339U Abnormal Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Abnormal Psychology offers students an examination of theories and psychological principles underlying the study of abnormal psychology, the field, research methods, classification models, ethics and legal issues.

PSYC 340U Getting Away with Murder
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines deception, manipulation, and malingering within the context of violent and anti-social acts. Emphasizes psychological, social, and biological factors associated with extreme violence among clinical and non-clinical (normal) populations. Explores development of criminal behavior and moral development. Introduces techniques for detecting deception and preventing manipulation.

PSYC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

PSYC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PSYC 502U Psychology of Terrorism
Semester hours: 3
Description
In the past decade, terrorism has emerged as a dynamic force dramatically impacting individuals and social systems. During this course we will review the history of terrorism, seek to understand the radicalization of terrorists, investigate the immediate and long-term reactions to acts of terrorism and explore the social and psychological implications of the war on terrorism.

PSYC 530U Organizational Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Organizational Psychology class will allow students to gain a broad understanding of many areas critical to effective human resource management. Further, the graduate level course will allow an in-depth understanding of many social sciences grounded theories and practices as applied to the real world business setting. The course will help students when faced with real world decisions including: determining selection strategies and selecting valid tools, how to drive performance and development with a performance appraisal tool, how to assess needs and train for results, how to develop and select effective leaders, how to design teams and deal with conflict, how to impact morale through satisfaction and motivation strategies, and how to manage and cope with work-related stress. The ultimate intention of the course is to equip students with the knowledge and tools they will need to positively impact their organizations.

PSYC 538U Forensic Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Forensic Psychology is designed to give students an understanding of the interaction between our legal system and psychology. Roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists will be examined. Topics covered will include criminal profiling with a focus on serial killers; the insanity defense; criminal competencies; child custody cases; eyewitness and expert testimonies; civil commitment for dangerous offenders; and victimization. Graduate students will write an 8-10 page research paper on a controversial topic in forensic psychology and will develop and deliver a 15-30 minute presentation to the class on the research paper.

PSYC 540U Getting Away with Murder
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines deception, manipulation, and malingering within the context of violent and anti-social acts. Emphasizes psychological, social, and biological factors associated with extreme violence among clinical and non-clinical (normal) populations. Explores development of criminal behavior and moral development. Introduces techniques for detecting deception and preventing manipulation.

PSYC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PSYC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 200U Patterns in Religion
Semester hours: 3
Description
Methodologies for study of religion, recurring themes and issues, religious expression in both individual and communal focus.

RELG 301U The Bible as Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
An examination of the diverse genres of Biblical literature, viewing passages in historical context to understand the multiple layers of the intended message: period about which written, the time of the writer, and the time of the expected recipient. Within Biblical exegesis, primary emphasis is given to literary and historical criticism.

RELG 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 501U The Bible as Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
An examination of the diverse genres of Biblical literature, viewing passages in historical context to understand the multiple layers of the intended message: period about which written, the time of the writer, and the time of the expected recipient. Within Biblical exegesis, primary emphasis is given to literary and historical criticism.

RELG 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SA 320U How to Be a Skeptic: Critical Thinking for Critical Times
Semester hours: 3
Description
Techniques to separate the probable from the unlikely and to acquire and interpret the information necessary to think logically. Addresses current issues, urban legends, invented traditions, and ancient mysteries.
Prerequisites
ENGL 100U & ENGL 101U or ENGL 201U, 202U & 203U.

SA 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SA 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 101U Introduction to Sociology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Fundamental concepts and principles of sociology; culture, socialization, social structure, stratification, social control, institutions, population, and social change.

SOC 305U Deviance
Semester hours: 3
Description
Social deviance at micro-sociological level, sociological explanations for and current methods of dealing with such behavior. Drug and alcohol abuse, sexual deviance, suicide, mental illness, and child and spouse abuse.

SOC 309U Social Problems
Semester hours: 3
Description
Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment: physical and mental handicaps; economic inadequacies; programs and methods of social treatment and control.

SOC 310U Criminology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Laws, prevalence and distribution of crime; theories of crime; types of criminal behavior; police actions; court actions; the penal system.

SOC 316U Race and Ethnicity in America
Semester hours: 3
Description
Native peoples; immigration and settlement of U.S.; racial and ethnic groups; prejudice and discrimination; race relations in racially and culturally diverse society.
Prerequisites
SOC 101U.

SOC 320U Alternative Lifestyles and Contemporary Families
Semester hours: 3
Description
Alternative Lifestyles and Contemporary Families: changes in the family as a social institution and the impact on society, blended families, inter-racial and same-sex marriages, gender roles and divorce are among the topics to be examined.

SOC 324U Sociology of Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to development of laws within societies, including philosophy and development of U.S. Court System. Laws regarding both criminal and civil proceedings, legal terms and concepts, and issues within legal system today. Strongly recommended for students planning career in law or criminal justice.

SOC 328U Social Gerontology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Processes of aging and problems of aged; social adjustment, retirement, mobility, living arrangements, and public and private programs of finance and care.

SOC 342U Dying, Death and Grief
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of current American attitudes toward death and dying. Social/emotional responses of dying patient, relatives, friends, and various helping professionals. Meaning and function of grief. Cross-cultural data included where possible.

SOC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 542U Death, Dying and Grief
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of current American attitudes toward death and dying. Social/emotional responses of dying patient, relatives, friends, and various helping professionals. Meaning and function of grief. Cross-cultural data included where possible.

SOC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SPAN 100U Practical Everyday Spanish
Semester hours: 3
Description
Multifaceted course designed to appeal to individuals interested in using Spanish language for business or for travel.

SPAN 198U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

SPCH 101U Principles of Speech Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Confidence in delivering public speeches. Logical structure of ideas, effective use of language, application of evidence to arguments. Classroom speeches and critiques.

SPCH 105U Interpersonal Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of complex and interacting factors that contribute to effective transmission of ideas; emphasis on understanding underlying principles.

SPCH 206U Group Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Modern theory and methodology; student participation in group discussion relating theory to specific communication problems.

SPCH 222U Business and Professional Speech
Semester hours: 3
Description
Making business presentation and giving corporate advocacy speech. Application to workplace of skills in listening, problem solving, interviewing, conducting meetings.

SPCH 328U Gendered Relationships - An Overview
Semester hours: 3
Description
Investigation of relatively informal interpersonal and social relationships between same and opposite genders in friendships, romantic relationships, families and the workplace. Central organizing theory base is that of interpersonal communication theory. Seminar style where student participation is maximized.

SPCH 329U The Dark Side of Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Relies on scholarly research to ignite discussion and debate on the value of the "dark side" paradigm, a metaphor used to examine immoral,abusive, dysfunctional, destructive and criminal dimensions of interpersonal communication. Topics include infidelity, bullying, intimate partner abuse, jealousy, stalking, child abuse, parent abuse, deception, and secrets.

SPCH 340U Cross-Cultural Communications
Semester hours: 3
Description
Studies dynamics of cross-cultural communication. Emphasis on familiarizing students with issues relating to diversity and improving student's skills in communication across cultural barriers.

SPCH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SPCH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

THTR 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

THTR 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

WMST 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

Contact Us

Liberal Arts Program
Professional & Continuing Studies
Special Programs Building
28 Westhampton Way
Univ. of Richmond, VA 23173

Phone: (804) 289-8133
spcs@richmond.edu