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Degree Program Courses with Descriptions

Alphabetical listing of all SPCS degree program courses.

ACCT 300U Survey of Accounting Principles
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analytical and interpretative approach to the study of financial and managerial accounting. Emphasizes effects of transactions on financial statements; interrelationships among financial statements; use of financial statements, cost accounting, and budgets for decision-making.

ACCT 301U Fundamentals of Financial Accounting
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic theory, concepts, and procedures necessary to develop and interpret publicly reported financial accounting data.

ACCT 302U Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic theory, concepts, and procedures necessary to develop and interpret managerial accounting data, including cost and budget information, and capital project evaluations, for managerial decision-making.
Prerequisites
ACCT 300U or ACCT 301U recommended.

ACCT 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ACCT 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 200U Experiential Learning and Portfolio Preparation
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of experiential learning, portfolio assessment and other alternative methods of earning college credit. Students gain confidence in critical thinking, organizing, and writing and a clearer sense of educational goals. In preparation for submitting a portfolio, students learn how to identify and assess learning that has occurred outside of the classroom, develop a narrative, and document their learning. This class is required for students planning to request credit by portfolio assessment.

ADED 201U Portfolio Submission/Assessment
Semester hours: 0
Description
For students who wish to seek credit for prior learning through the Portfolio program.
Prerequisites
ADED 200U

ADED 300U Knowledge Management - Methods of Learning and Thinking
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring techniques of learning and developing access skills and opportunities for critical thinking.

ADED 301U Knowledge Management: Seminar Across the Disciplines I
Semester hours: 3
Description
ADED 301U develops advanced reading, writing, and research techniques, using a variety of disciplinary approaches. It will require students to read a range of primary and scholarly texts related to the content of the course, synthesizing them in assignments of varying medium, length, and purpose. It will also require them to locate, evaluate, and incorporate a wide range of research sources. Explicit writing instruction will be central to the course.
Prerequisites
ENGL 202U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ADED 302U Knowledge Management: Seminar Across the Disciplines II
Semester hours: 3
Description
ADED 302U builds upon the skills developed in ADED 301U, culminating with a significant research project. It will require students to read a range of primary and scholarly texts related to the content of the course, synthesizing them in assignments of varying medium, length, and purpose - including a research-driven essay and presentation. Explicit research instruction will be central to the course.
Prerequisites
Completion of ADED 301U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ADED 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ADED 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 315U Introduction to Physical Anthropology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Combines research and data from biological and social sciences. Primarily concerned with human beings as biological entities and the relationship between human biology and culture. In addition to basic evolutionary theory and principles of biological inheritance, topics include hominid evolution, primate studies, biological and cultural adaptation to new and/or changing environments, and forensic anthropology. Current issues include cloning, DNA manipulation, Out of Africa vs. Multi-evolution theories, race as a cultural, non-biological construction.

ANTH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ANTH 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ARCH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ARCH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 208U Techniques and Aesthetics of Photography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Hands-on explanation of technical process involved with black and white photography from exposure to finished print with detailed instruction of processing and printing, classroom critique of students' and other professional work, and introduction to different types of photography. Students encouraged to express desires, emotions, and intentions visually through photographic medium.

ART 209U Photography as Art
Semester hours: 3
Description
Basic black and white darkroom techniques emphasizing development of aesthetic sensibilities. History of photography through exposure to work of past and contemporary photographers.

ART 212U Art Appreciation
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to the arts, designed to broaden students' background.

ART 300U Color Photography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to technical considerations and development of artistic expression with color materials. Student work discussed in context of larger aesthetic history of color photography. Focus placed on new media and electronic darkroom.

ART 301U Introduction to Photoshop
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to using Photoshop as a digital darkroom and a powerful means of processing images using digital and traditional photography. Topics will include navigation and tools, selections and layer masks, history palette and history brush, file formats, color correction, digital zone system, and image resolution.

ART 315U Art of the Renaissance
Semester hours: 3
Description
Italian and Northern Renaissance Art.

ART 329U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

ART 347U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of life and times of Thomas Jefferson including historical perspective of him as statesman, politician, and writer as well as study of him as architect and planner. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

ART 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 518U The Gilded Age
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Gilded Age in American history was the modern United States' formative period. It was an exciting, exuberant, innovative, progressive, glittering era in which America was in the process of becoming a world power. But the Gilded Age was also an era of greed, guile, corruption, poverty, and inequality. Learn about the rise of America to global status, about the American artists of the period and their work, about the nation¿s urbanization and industrialization, about the new American millionaires, and about why Mark Twain called the era "gilded" rather than "golden."

ART 529U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

ART 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ART 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ARTS 105U Art for Non-Majors: Introduction to Drawing
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to drawing materials and techniques; the basics of two-dimensional design, including a brief introduction to color theory. The semester will culminate in the execution of a three-dimensional work of art. No previous experience will be assumed; a hands-on, lab-style course.

ARTS 115U Art for Non-Majors: Introduction to Painting
Semester hours: 3
Description
Students will explore the traditional use of oil paints and techniques through both still life and abstract painting assignments. Lectures on art history, technical demonstrations. Some previous drawing experience is suggested; it is not required.

ARTS 126U Drawing Materials and Techniques
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction for both beginners and more advanced students to explore a wide variety of drawing materials and techniques. The materials introduced will include graphite, charcoal, pastels, ink, conte, and silverpoint. Techniques covered will be hatching and cross-hatching, stippling, additive and subtractive drawing, working with washes, monoprinting and more. Students will work representationally for the majority of the semester. The objective is for students to explore a wide range of drawing possibilities as a means of expressing themselves visually.

ARTS 127U Watercolors
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of the use of traditional and experimental watercolor painting techniques. Landscape, still life, and architecture will serve as the subjects of the students' paintings. Students will also work on abstract and non-objective projects. Previous painting and drawing experience is not required. Effort and attendance are essential to the student¿s success.

ARTS 198U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-3

ARTS 305U Digital Photography
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed as an introduction to creative digital photography as a fine art. Students will learn the basics of camera controls, exposure, lighting, and composition. The class will participate in discussions on the concept of a digital aesthetic. The software program Adobe Photoshop will be used as a digital darkroom preparing images to print. Topics will include digital adjustments and output along with digital printing. The genres of portraiture, nature, action, and landscape will be explored through hands-on assignments. A digital camera with manual adjustments for exposure is required.

ARTS 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 221U Environmental Biology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Humankind's position in and influence on ecosystems of world viewed biologically and physically.

BIOL 280U Human Anatomy with Lab
Semester hours: 3.5
Description
Survey of basic human anatomy, with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and nervous systems.
Prerequisites
Departmental approval

BIOL 301U Environmental Ethics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of complexities of environmental relationships and issues including scientific knowledge, economic, political, social, and moral values within the U.S. and between countries of the world. Will explore alternative solutions to environmental problems from multiple perspectives through various value/moral systems.

BIOL 302U Global Sustainability
Semester hours: 3
Description
Global Sustainability examines the twenty-five global issues that the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development has identified as the most critical global social, economic and environmental challenges that are driving global change. Having gained an understanding of these forces and how societies can adapt to become more sustainable, students learn how to develop approaches to address the challenges.

BIOL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 502U Global Sustainability
Semester hours: 3
Description
Global Sustainability examines the twenty-five global issues that the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development has identified as the most critical global social, economic and environmental challenges that are driving global change. Having gained an understanding of these forces and how societies can adapt to become more sustainable, students learn how to develop approaches to address the challenges.

BIOL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

BIOL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

CLAC 250U Spanish: Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Spanish materials relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Proficiency in Spanish or permission of instructor and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

CLAC 550U Spanish: Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Spanish materials relevant to materials in the primary course.
Prerequisites
Proficiency in Spanish or permission of instructor and registration in the course to which the CLAC section is connected or having taken the primary course in the past. Some exceptions might be made.

ECON 201U Microeconomics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of supply and demand, market structure, production, market failure (e.g., pollution), and benefits and costs of government intervention.

ECON 202U Macroeconomics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of inflation, unemployment, GDP determination, money supply, balance of payments, currency markets, role of fiscal and monetary policies.

ECON 285U Teacher Summer Economics Institute
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey course designed to introduce classroom educators to the field of economics and economic thought. Introduction to both micro and macro principles, and the economic way of thinking. Topics include discussions on scarcity, supply and demand, economic growth, specialization and economic cooperation, interdependence and trade, employment and unemployment, prices, inflation and deflation, competitiveness and productivity, money and banking, and monetary policy. Instruction will also include hands-on sessions to allow participants to learn how to integrate economics into their classroom instruction.

ECON 377U Principles of Economics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey course which introduces students to the general economic principles that guide the nation's economy and influences HRM. Topics will include such things as inflation, exchange rates, consumer price index, and supply and demand. Focus will be placed on how economic variables influence such things as supply of labor, compensation, recruitment, and retention.

ECON 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ECON 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ECON 507U Labor Economics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey course that introduces students to the general economic principles that guide the nation's economy and influences HRM. Topics will include such things as inflation, exchange rates, consumer price index, and supply and demand. Focus will placed on how economic variables influence such things as supply of labor, compensation, recruitment, and retention.

ECON 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ECON 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

EDUC 303U Foundations of Arts Integration
Semester hours: 3
Description
Explores theory and pedagogy of integrating all arts form (visual, music, drama, dance, literary) across the curriculum and throughout the teaching and learning environment. Includes best practices, skill building, and exploration of resources to provide educators the tools and ability to effectively address and variety of students' learning styles while promoting curiosity, mastery of content and collaborative problem-solving skills.

EDUC 307U Instruction and Assessment in Elementary Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of fundamental science concepts and subject-specific pedagogy, focusing on Earth, life, and physical sciences, the nature of science and scientific inquiry, the social and cultural significance of science, the relationship of science to technology, and the historical development of scientific concepts and scientific reasoning. Course content emphasizes and integrates state and national standards, problem-solving approaches, curriculum integration strategies, content area literacy, and current research.

EDUC 308U Instruction and Assessment in Elementary Social Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of fundamental social studies concepts and subject-specific pedagogy, focusing on history, geography, economics, and civics. Course content emphasizes instructional design and integrates state and national standards, project-based learning approaches, curriculum integration strategies, content area literacy, and current research.

EDUC 317U Foundations of Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to the American educational system. Explores the philosophical, sociological, historical, and political roots of schools today. Attention also given to the legal status of teachers and students, including federal and state laws and regulations, school as an organization/culture, and contemporary issues in education. Explores professionalism, ethics, performance standards, and integrity for teachers.

EDUC 318U Diverse Learners
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces students to the wide range of diversity that exists in schools today. Explores diverse learning styles and students' needs, and connections to cultures, communities, and family values as well as student support through trauma informed care. Provides theoretical underpinnings and contemporary perspective on critical issues, professional practices, and state and federal laws influencing the teaching of students with diverse learning needs, including specific learning disabilities (SLD) such as dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and auditory processing disorders.

EDUC 324U Reading Foundations for Early Literacy Instruction
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of the teaching methods, literacy concepts and development, and materials that are used to support and scaffold children's literacy acquisition from birth to the primary grades. A foundational understanding of the components of reading including phonemic awareness, concepts of print, phonics, fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, and writing will be addressed. Participants will examine early literacy assessment tools and will determine how to implement interventions for diverse learners. Language development, children's literature, and classroom strategies for early literacy instruction will also be investigated.

EDUC 326U Assessment, Intervention and Literacy Strategies for Elementary Readers
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of reading comprehension, vocabulary development, critical thinking, word study, and writing instruction within elementary classrooms. Study of the methods, materials, and assessment tools associated with elementary literacy instruction will be explored across the components of reading. Participants will examine assessment tools and learn techniques for meeting the needs of struggling readers. A supervised practical experience will be incorporated into the course. Emphasis is placed on making decisions based upon students' individual needs and critical reflection to improve instructional effectiveness. Participants will learn to analyze assessment data and use this information to inform instructional practices including developing reading and writing interventions. Effective literacy techniques designed to support diverse learners will be studied.
Prerequisites
EDUC 324U.

EDUC 327U Content and Pedagogy for Elementary Mathematics
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of fundamental mathematics concepts and subject-specific pedagogy. Course content emphasizes and integrates state and national standards, problem-solving approaches, use of manipulatives and technology, current research, and learning theory.

EDUC 338U Advanced Instructional Design
Semester hours: 3
Description
Instructional design is the systematic and reflective process of translating principles of learning and instruction into plans for instructional materials, activities, information, resources and evaluation (Smith, 1999). This course combines knowledge of learning theory with technology skills to maximize the effectiveness of instructional design. Using hands on learning experiences students will acquire knowledge of instructional methods, digital tools and the principles of design.
Prerequisites
EDUC 342U or EDUC 307U

EDUC 342U Teaching in Middle and Secondary Schools
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive introduction to pedagogy to include principles of learning; application of skills in discipline and grade-specific methodology; selection and use of materials; state and national curriculum standards; and evaluation of student performance.

EDUC 343U Assessment and Evaluation in Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to testing, measurement, and evaluation related to instruction, the construction and use of teacher-made tests, a survey of standardized tests, test interpretation, and basic statistical procedures.

EDUC 350U Content Area Literacy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of reading, writing and critical thinking in secondary content areas. Specific techniques for teaching and assessing comprehensions, vocabulary knowledge, and study skills will be addressed. The effects of text organization and relationship between reading and writing are investigated. The course integrates theory with practice and is designed to help content area instructors learn how to integrate literacy principles into subject matter instruction. A strong emphasis will be placed on the elements of effective comprehension instruction. Literacy techniques designed to support the needs of diverse learners will be studied. Participants will learn strategies to foster motivation and appreciation of a variety of types of literature utilized for independent and collaborative reading.

EDUC 358U Classroom and Behavior Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Behavioral theories, principles and procedures for reducing classroom problems, increasing motivation, and strengthening desired classroom behavior. In addition, the developmental stages experienced by students between the ages of birth through adolescence in the areas of speech/language, social, physical, intellectual, and emotional development.

EDUC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

EDUC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

EDUC 475U Student Teaching, Elementary (PreK-6)
Semester hours: 12
Description
Direct contact with students in a classroom on a full-time basis for 15 weeks under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities. Graded pass/fail; however a comprehensive evaluation is completed for each student teacher.
Prerequisites
Completion of all core courses.

EDUC 477U Student Teaching, Secondary (6-12)
Semester hours: 12
Description
Direct contact with students in a classroom on a full-time basis for 15 weeks under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities. Graded pass/fail; however a comprehensive evaluation is completed for each student teacher.
Prerequisites
Completion of all core courses.

EDUC 478U Student Teaching, Comprehensive (PreK-12)
Semester hours: 12
Description
Direct contact with students in a classroom on a full-time basis for 15 weeks under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities. Graded pass/fail; however a comprehensive evaluation is completed for each student teacher.
Prerequisites
Completion of all core courses.

EDUC 485U Student Teaching Seminar
Semester hours: 2
Description
This weekly seminar for student teachers provides a forum for discussion and examination of critical issues related to students' teaching responsibilities and competence. Also provides guidance in the preparation of the Teacher Work Sample.

EDUC 503U Foundations of Arts Integration
Semester hours: 3
Description
Explores theory and pedagogy of integrating all arts form (visual, music, drama, dance, literary) across the curriculum and throughout the teaching and learning environment. Includes best practices, skill building, and exploration of resources to provide educators the tools and ability to effectively address and variety of students' learning styles while promoting curiosity, mastery of content and collaborative problem-solving skills.

EDUC 504U The Story of Virginia, an American Experience
Semester hours: 3
Description
The course provides an overview of the history of Virginia from earliest habitation to the present and follows the curriculum framework for Virginia Studies. Participants will work with the staff of the Virginia Historical Society and outside pedagogical specialists and engage the topic through lectures, discussions of readings, written exercises, workshops, and interactive gallery activities.

EDUC 505U Geography of the Commonwealth
Semester hours: 3
Description
The objective of this course is to provide a general understanding of the Geography of the Commonwealth of Virginia and explore various spatial interests in depth. No textbooks or lab manuals are required for this course, only the ability to use Blackboard and explore the web. You will also learn how to use ArcGIS Online.

EDUC 507U Instruction and Assessment in Elementary Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of fundamental science concepts and subject-specific pedagogy, focusing on Earth, life, and physical sciences, the nature of science and scientific inquiry, the social and cultural significance of science, the relationship of science to technology, and the historical development of scientific concepts and scientific reasoning. Course content emphasizes and integrates state and national standards, problem-solving approaches, curriculum integration strategies, content area literacy, and current research.

EDUC 508U Instruction and Assessment in Elementary Social Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of fundamental social studies concepts and subject-specific pedagogy, focusing on history, geography, economics, and civics. Course content emphasizes instructional design and integrates state and national standards, project-based learning approaches, curriculum integration strategies, content area literacy, and current research.

EDUC 509U Teaching Students from Poverty
Semester hours: 3
Description
An overview of the challenges of teaching students from poverty. Dr. Ruby Payne's groundbreaking book will be the centerpiece for teachers (K-12). Teachers will learn skills and techniques to manage behavior, build relationships and raise achievement.

EDUC 517U Foundations of Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to the American educational system. Explores the philosophical, sociological, historical, and political roots of schools today. Attention also given to the legal status of teachers and students, including federal and state laws and regulations, school as an organization/culture, and contemporary issues in education. Explores professionalism, ethics, performance standards, and integrity for teachers.

EDUC 518U Diverse Learners
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces students to the wide range of diversity that exists in schools today. Explores diverse learning styles and students' needs, and connections to cultures, communities, and family values as well as student support through trauma informed care. Provides theoretical underpinnings and contemporary perspective on critical issues, professional practices, and state and federal laws influencing the teaching of students with diverse learning needs, including specific learning disabilities (SLD) such as dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and auditory processing disorders.

EDUC 524U Reading Foundations for Early Literacy Instruction
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of the teaching methods, literacy concepts and development, and materials that are used to support and scaffold children's literacy acquisition from birth to the primary grades. A foundational understanding of the components of reading including phonemic awareness, concepts of print, phonics, fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, and writing will be addressed. Participants will examine early literacy assessment tools and will determine how to implement interventions for diverse learners. Language development, children's literature, and classroom strategies for early literacy instruction will also be investigated.

EDUC 526U Assessment, Intervention and Literacy Strategies for Elementary Readers
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of reading comprehension, vocabulary development, critical thinking, word study, and writing instruction within elementary classrooms. Study of the methods, materials, and assessment tools associated with elementary literacy instruction will be explored across the components of reading. Participants will examine assessment tools and learn techniques for meeting the needs of struggling readers. A supervised practical experience will be incorporated into the course. Emphasis is placed on making decisions based upon students' individual needs and critical reflection to improve instructional effectiveness. Participants will learn to analyze assessment data and use this information to inform instructional practices including developing reading and writing interventions. Effective literacy techniques designed to support diverse learners will be studied.
Prerequisites
EDUC 524U.

EDUC 527U Content and Pedagogy for Elementary Mathematics
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth examination of fundamental mathematics concepts and subject-specific pedagogy. Course content emphasizes and integrates state and national standards, problem-solving approaches, use of manipulatives and technology, current research, and learning theory.

EDUC 529U Improving Elementary Math
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of teachers' content knowledge and pedagogical skills in teaching elementary math with a focus on differentiated instruction using developmental grouping (math workshop and work stations) to improve elementary math achievement. Class sessions will involve participants in activities that address concrete, representational, and abstract stages of learning.

EDUC 530U Teaching Middle School Life Science: Content and Pedagogy
Semester hours: 3
Description
This graduate course will examine the psychology of the middle school learner, the instructional strategies and practices essential to developing successful student learners, including knowledge and understanding of the life science curriculum and the application of its standards.

EDUC 531U Teaching Middle School Earth Science: Content and Pedagogy
Semester hours: 3
Description
This graduate course will examine the psychology of the middle school learner, the instructional strategies and practices essential to developing successful student learners, including knowledge and understanding of the earth science curriculum and the application of its standards.

EDUC 532U Teaching Middle School Physical Science: Content and Pedagogy
Semester hours: 3
Description
This graduate course will examine the psychology of the middle school learner, the instructional strategies and practices essential to developing successful student learners, including knowledge and understanding of the physical science curriculum and the application of its standards.

EDUC 533U Sustainability and Nature Institute
Semester hours: 3
Description
An exploration of the science and design behind creating a successful outdoor classroom and is suited for classroom teachers, administrators, PTA representatives and Not for Profit educators. Participants will work with other educators from throughout the mid-Atlantic region to develop a plan for an outdoor classroom where students can explore opportunities for decision making, learning, social development, and establishing sustainable practices grounded in the natural world. Central to the program will be hands-on lab work emphasizing the science of soil, plant biology, and proper planting practices, which are increasingly important as we move towards a more sustainable future in the outdoor world.

EDUC 542U Teaching in Middle and Secondary Schools
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive introduction to pedagogy to include principles of learning; application of skills in discipline and grade-specific methodology; selection and use of materials; state and national curriculum standards; and evaluation of student performance.
Prerequisites
Concurrent registration in EDUC 543U.

EDUC 543U Assessment and Evaluation in Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to testing, measurement, and evaluation related to instruction, the construction and use of teacher-made tests, a survey of standardized tests, test interpretation, and basic statistical procedures.

EDUC 544U Tools for Teaching
Semester hours: 3
Description
An integrated discipline, instruction and motivation system. Intended for the practicing teacher (K-12), participants will learn how to organize a classroom to reduce disruption and increase time on task, increase learning and retention of material with the Say, See, Do instructional approach and Visual Instruction Plans (VIPs), eliminate backtalk and teacher nagging, and turn problem students around with an incentive system that builds responsible behavior.

EDUC 550U Content Area Literacy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of reading, writing and critical thinking in secondary content areas. Specific techniques for teaching and assessing comprehensions, vocabulary knowledge, and study skills will be addressed. The effects of text organization and relationship between reading and writing are investigated. The course integrates theory with practice and is designed to help content area instructors learn how to integrate literacy principles into subject matter instruction. A strong emphasis will be placed on the elements of effective comprehension instruction. Literacy techniques designed to support the needs of diverse learners will be studied. Participants will learn strategies to foster motivation and appreciation of a variety of types of literature utilized for independent and collaborative reading.

EDUC 551U Cross Cultural Communications
Semester hours: 3
Description
After completing this course, candidates will know, understand, and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to the nature and role of culture and cultural groups to construct supportive learning environments for ELLs (Domain 2. Culture). Candidates will keep current with new instructional techniques, research results, advances in the ESL field, and education policy issues, and demonstrate knowledge of the history of ESL teaching. They use such information to reflect on and improve their instruction and assessment practices. Candidates work collaboratively with school staff and the community to improve the learning environment, to provide support, and to advocate for ELLs and their families (Domain 5. Professionalism).

EDUC 552U English Linguistics for TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages)
Semester hours: 3
Description
After completing this course, candidates will know, understand, and use the major theories and research related to the structure and acquisition of language to help English language learners (ELL) develop language and literacy and achieve in the content areas (Domain 1. Language).

EDUC 553U Methods of Teaching a Foreign Language
Semester hours: 3
Description
This introductory course addresses the effects of language acquisition theories and learner development on instructional planning and practice and builds upon the relationship of foreign language program models and language outcomes. Participants will become familiar with the state standards for foreign language learning and recognize the connection between the state and national standards.

EDUC 554U Assessment of English Learners
Semester hours: 3
Description
Addresses issues and concepts of assessment and using standards based procedures with English Language Learners (ELL). Identifies purposes of assessment (e.g., diagnostic, language proficiency, academic achievement) and basic concepts of assessment in order to assess ELL. Examines national and state requirements, procedures, and instruments for ELL identification, reclassification, and exit from language support programs. Covers the interdependent relationship between teaching and assessment and developing instructional tasks and assessment tools that promote and measure student learning. (Domain 4. Assessment)

EDUC 555U Curriculum for Talented and Gifted Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on curriculum adjustments, methods and techniques, as well as classroom organization necessary for teaching gifted and talented students. Emphasis is on curriculum in gifted programs within the context of school reform and restructuring. Topics include development of learner outcomes, selection of resources, and classroom management.

EDUC 556U Differentiated Instruction and Research-Based Strategies for Gifted Students
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of the philosophy of differentiation and strategies that are used to meet the needs of gifted students. Instructional decision-making based on the educational characteristics and subsequent modification within the classroom environment will be the emphasis through this online course. Research-based instructional strategies for gifted and talented learners will be explored in addition to classroom-based differentiated instruction; individualization; flexible grouping strategies; dialogue and questioning strategies; enrichment, and instructional responsiveness to the affective needs of gifted learners.

EDUC 558U Classroom and Behavior Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Behavioral theories, principles and procedures for reducing classroom problems, increasing motivation, and strengthening desired classroom behavior. In addition, the developmental stages experienced by students between the ages of birth through adolescence in the areas of speech/language, social, physical, intellectual, and emotional development.

EDUC 559U Politics and Legal Issues in Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides historical and contemporary perspectives regarding how the American political and legal systems affect the care and instruction of students in today's schools; and an understanding of the political issues and laws that govern the operation and conduct of American schools.

EDUC 561U Perspectives in Gifted Education, Talent Development and Creativity
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course explores the concepts of Gifted Education, Talent Development and Creativity (GETDC), and examines their factors, measurement, and application to education. Topics include characteristics of creative individuals, barriers to creative productivity, strategies to increase creative and critical thinking, and teaching creativity in special populations of gifted learners.

EDUC 562U Special Populations of Gifted Students
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course provides a critical survey of the research, issues, policy, ethics, and practices related to culturally diverse, economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient, twice exceptional, highly gifted, or very young gifted and talented students. Includes examination of topics such as personal attitudes about diversity, identification of students from special populations, differentiated instruction for students from special populations.

EDUC 564U School-wide Positive Behavior Support
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines positive behavioral interventions and support (PBIS) with emphasis on school-wide approaches designed to enhance school climate and emotional well-being of all students. Covers creating and nurturing a problem-solving team of professionals responsible for developing evidence-based strategies for improving the behavior and academic achievement of students.

EDUC 565U Foundations and Legal Aspects of Special Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
This is an introductory course that provides an overview of the nature and educational implications of serving students with disabilities and emphasizes the legal aspects of special education at national, state, and local levels. Relevant legislation associated with the identification, education and evaluation of students with disabilities will be included in this foundations course.

EDUC 566U Response to Intervention
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed to provide participants with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively implement a Response To Intervention approach for academics and behavior. Response to Intervention is the practice of providing high quality instruction and interventions matched to students.

EDUC 567U Questions of Conscience: Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Teacher Education Institute (TEI) is taught by museum staff, including university, research, and classroom educators. TEI assists history, English/language arts, music, art, science, math, foreign language and administrators with their understanding of the Holocaust and modern genocide and the application of it within their classrooms and schools and considers the Virginia Standards of Learning requirements as well as the requirements of the Holocaust Education Bill, HB2409 recently passed by the General Assembly.

EDUC 568U Successful Transition through Consultation and Collaboration
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates with the ability to prepare their students and work with families to provide successful student transitions throughout the educational experience. Additionally, teacher candidates will learn strategies for successful consultation, case management and collaboration for establishing an effective school environment, postsecondary training, employment, and independent living that address an understanding of long-term planning, career development, life skills, community experiences and resources, self-advocacy, and self-determination, guardianship and legal considerations.

EDUC 569U Recognizing and Teaching Students with Disabilities - Accessing the General Education Curriculum
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course explores the characteristics and supports needs of students with disabilities in the general education setting and delves into the development of individual education planning and group instruction at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Specific learning strategies, multisensory approaches, and organizational and environmental considerations will be investigated through the scope and sequence of the general education curriculum. Alternative ways of instruction and assessment will be examined to support student learning needs with effective and student-appropriate strategies and accommodations to promote successful integration with nondisabled peers in general education classrooms and, as appropriate, in other instructional settings, representing the continuum of special education services.

EDUC 570U Talented and Gifted: Working with High Achievers
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course provides information on the history of exceptional students in relation to education, current law, and accepted methods for referral, assessment, and identification. It covers major program models and methods of differentiating instruction to meet the rate and level of learning of those students identified. The course gives the learner an understanding of ways to meet the affective needs of the gifted and talented student in the regular classroom and lists resources for teachers and parents who would like more information about the talented and gifted.

EDUC 571U Assessment and Evaluation in Special Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed to introduce teacher candidates to the variety of assessment and evaluation techniques and their specific purposes, including eligibility for students with disabilities, instructional decision making, and program improvement. This course explores the relationship among the general curriculum, formal and informal assessment results, and instruction for students with disabilities to support instructional planning, decision-making and self-reflection.

EDUC 572U Effective Instruction for an Inclusive Classroom
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey of models, history, current issues and strategies in providing collaborative supports, accommodations, and differentiated curriculum to students with disabilities, special needs, as well as mainstream students with multiple abilities in general education classes.

EDUC 574U Understanding and Implementing the IEP
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course provides students with critical information and hands-on practice regarding the developmentvand implementation of the Individual Education Program (IEP), the federally required document that describes all the components of special education services and safeguards for students with disabilities. Participants will learn regulatory background, essential components, procedural requirements, implementation practices, and monitoring strategies that support effective IEP implementation and lead to positive student outcomes. Participants will analyze and evaluate IEPs, gaining expertise in IEP development and implementation.

EDUC 575U Student Teaching, Elementary (PreK-6)
Semester hours: 12
Description
Direct contact with students in a classroom on a full-time basis for 15 weeks under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities.
Prerequisites
Completion of all professional studies coursework.

EDUC 577U Student Teaching, Secondary (6-12)
Semester hours: 12
Description
Direct contact with students in a classroom on a full-time basis for 15 weeks under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities.
Prerequisites
Completion of all professional studies coursework.

EDUC 578U Student Teaching, Comprehensive (PreK-12)
Semester hours: 12
Description
Direct contact with students in a classroom on a full-time basis for 15 weeks under the direction of a cooperating teacher and a University supervisor. Student assumes full teacher responsibility for all instructional periods and school activities.
Prerequisites
Completion of all professional studies coursework.

EDUC 580U Curriculum Development and Instructional Strategies for Teaching English Learners
Semester hours: 3
Description
A training class for those wishing to gain appropriate skills for teaching ESL students. This class will focus on understanding the method of teaching conversational English; understanding the international Phonetic Alphabet; application of target language groups; essentials of English - know what you teach; methods of instruction (includes drills, activities, lesson resources); and application of knowledge as students have guided practice in developing skills.

EDUC 585U Student Teaching Seminar
Semester hours: 2
Description
This weekly seminar for student teachers provides a forum for discussion and examination of critical issues related to students' teaching responsibilities and competence. Also provides guidance in the preparation of the Teacher Work Sample.
Prerequisites
Completion of all professional studies coursework.

EDUC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

EDUC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

EDUC 601U Foundations of Educational Leadership Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey of the fundamental leadership theories and models as they apply to educational leadership. Includes historical and contemporary conceptions, collaborative case study work on current educational leadership approaches, personal reflection and leadership development, and bridging theory and practice in twenty-first century schools.

EDUC 602U Data for Decision-Making
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey of tools and techniques used in conducting and utilizing assessment data. Includes current research approaches, project design, and data collection. Also included are methods for using data to identify school needs, evaluate personnel, track student performance, and develop strategies for increasing performance as necessary.

EDUC 603U Leading and Supervising Instruction
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course will prepare students to effectively oversee instructional practices in their school. These include aligning curriculum and instruction with assessment to achieve high academic success, innovative instructional techniques, strategies for monitoring instruction and providing feedback, and encouraging academic freedom and innovation while respecting benchmarks and standards.

EDUC 604U Communicating and Leading
Semester hours: 3
Description
A broad review of communication as a critical skill in effective school leadership. This includes understanding how students communicate with each other and their instructors, helping students develop basic communication techniques and strategies, communicating effectively with teachers and administrators, and understanding the impact of the new communications age as well as how to effectively use it to improve communication within schools.

EDUC 605U School Law and Ethics
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course will examine the legal and moral aspects of educational leadership. Includes evolution of school law, major ethical spheres of thought, current trends and school law, and critical thinking and problem-solving strategies. Course will utilize case studies and consider Virginia School Code.

EDUC 610U Reflective Leadership Seminar I
Semester hours: 1
Description
Students will apply their coursework to modern education settings and reflect on where and how the lessons and theory from those courses are relevant to working and leading in today's schools. This includes assessing how and where strategies and ideas explored in previous coursework can be infused into school leadership.

EDUC 611U Reflective Leadership Seminar II
Semester hours: 6
Description
The second of two required seminars to complete the practicum. Students will continue the reflective process by studying leadership first-hand in a school. Students will spend a minimum of 170 hours in a designated school and regularly report on a series of online reflection prompts addressing various issues affecting educational leadership.

EDUC 620U Children's Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
The course provides a survey of children's literature with emphasis on recent trends and evaluative criteria used in selecting books based on school and recreational needs and interests of young readers. Course participants will explore multiple genres, including historical fiction, realistic fiction, fantasy, traditional literature, nonfiction, and multicultural, and ways of integrating these books into curricula.

EDUC 621U Young Adult Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
The course provides a survey of young adult literature with emphasis on recent trends and evaluative criteria used in selecting books based on school and recreational needs and interests of adolescent readers. Course participants will explore multiple genres, including historical fiction, realistic fiction, fantasy, traditional literature, nonfiction, graphic novels, and multicultural, and ways of integrating these books into curricula.

EDUC 630U School Technology
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed to advance technological literacy for school leaders. This includes running software, using programs to generate and manipulate data, compiling data in order to present it, troubleshooting basic computer challenges, using technology to communicate and collaborate with others, and using technology to support instruction.

EDUC 631U Fiscal Leadership
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course will introduce students to the principles of human resource and financial management. This includes recruiting and developing quality personnel, the budgeting process, and fiscal decision-making.

EDUC 632U Leading Change in Educational Settings
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course will focus on identifying new trends in schools and education policy as well as preparing for and successfully embracing change. This includes demographic shifts, the impact of globalization and the computer age, the evolving relationship between schools and their greater communities, implementing new policy, and ensuring successful transitions to changes involving policy, personnel, and student body.

EDUC 633U School Culture and Human Resource Leadership
Description
This course will explore the sociological trends impacting the modern school environment and how to lead various groups within a school. This includes conflict resolution, balancing interests and decision-making, promoting a learning environment that maximizes student performance, and managing relationships among groups operating within a school as well as the larger community.
Prerequisites
3

EDUC 634U Context of Educational Public Policy and Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A survey of contemporary issues and legislation affecting education policy. Includes review of current and emerging issues, strategies for influencing policy, and techniques for adopting new policy into current school culture and process.

EDUC 650U Advanced Educational Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Advanced study of the basic principles of cognitive psychology and its position in education, to include cognitive processes, knowledge acquisition and transfer, beliefs and motivation, and the application of these ideas to classroom instruction.

EDUC 651U Assessment and Evaluation in Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to testing, measurement, and evaluation related to instruction, the construction and use of teacher-made tests, a survey of standardized tests, test interpretation, and basic statistical procedures.

EDUC 652U Differentiated Instruction
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to differentiated instruction and examination of why it is appropriate for all learners, how to plan for it, and how to become comfortable enough with student differences to make school comfortable for every learner in the classroom.

EDUC 653U Issues, Ethics and Policy in Education
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination and reflection on the critical issues in policy, ethics, and law that teachers need in order to make informed decisions regarding a variety of issues facing schools today.

EDUC 660U Curriculum Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Identification and understanding of the underlying philosophical principles, societal expectations, and practical demands that must be reflected in the development, delivery and evaluation of school curricula.

EDUC 661U Instructional Leadership
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course emphasizes techniques of improving instruction through application of research on effective schools and models of instruction. Topics covered include foundations of leadership, leadership for curriculum instruction and assessment, leadership for supervision and professional development, leadership for communication and community partnerships, and leadership for organizational management.

EDUC 675U Reflective Teaching Experience
Semester hours: 3
Description
Involves full time teaching and working closely with a mentor/coach to further develop skills in curriculum planning and delivery, reflection and self-assessment. Encompasses an entire semester.

EDUC 676U Reflective Practitioner Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
This biweekly seminar for teachers provides a forum for discussion of and reflection on critical issues related to their daily responsibilities as classroom teachers. Also provides guidance in the development and implementation of a Professional Growth Plan.
Prerequisites
EDUC 675U.

EDUC 680U Content Specialization and Research I
Semester hours: 3
Description
Review of basic knowledge and skills required for reading, interpreting, and evaluating, followed by the examination of step-by-step procedures for planning, implementing, and evaluating classroom research.

EDUC 681U Content Specialization and Research II
Semester hours: 3
Description
Design and implement an educational research project focusing on improving student learning, school culture, educational leadership, or other topics relevant in educational settings as well as recommendations for improvement based on research findings. Students will provide formal dissemination of research results.
Prerequisites
EDUC 680U

EM 312U Emergency Management Systems and Theory
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the structure and missions of local, state, national, and international emergency management agencies and their relationship with public safety and voluntary organizations and other government departments. Relates structure and processes to legal requirements for disaster management. Discusses current theoretical approaches to disasters and to emergency management program management. Based on structure, legal requirements, and theory; suggests courses of action for effective local program management.

EM 317U Enterprise Risk Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Identification of the impacts of disaster events is critical to understanding how an organization can survive the impact and continue to operate. Examines the business impact analysis process, how to manage it, and how to use the analysis as the first step in continuity plan development.
Prerequisites
EM 312U, EM 331U.

EM 331U Homeland Security Policy and Programs
Semester hours: 3
Description
Describes evolution of homeland defense as policy, programmatic, and organizational issue. Identifies current policies and programs, suggest evaluation measures, and assesses their effectiveness against potential threats. Examines role of governmental and voluntary citizen organizations in creating an effective homeland defense.

EM 352U Internship in the Emergency Services
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides student opportunity to learn from significant new work or volunteer experiences in emergency services. Students complete a minimum of 250 hours of work in the internship setting with focus on performing management or staff duties appropriate to operation of the organization. Students learn how to evaluate and document their own learning on the job.
Prerequisites
Completion of half of degree and 18 hours of EM course work.

EM 354U Organization and Management of Public Agencies
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines why and how public agencies operate the way they do. Studies the forces acting upon public safety agencies and how those forces shape agencies' internal and external practices in their political environment.
Prerequisites
EM 312U, EM 331U.

EM 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6
Prerequisites
EM 312U, EM 331U.

EM 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

EM 401U Honors Directed Research
Semester hours: 3
Description
Guided research on specific topics of significance in the field under supervision by a faculty member. Topics are required to have a significant theoretical component. Student work will result in an article acceptable for publication.
Prerequisites
Invitation of the instructor as approved by the Program Director.

EM 495U Hazards and Threats for the Future
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the future of disasters and their management in the context of long-term political, environmental, technological, economic and social change. Identifies current methods for futures analysis and provides a framework for developing tools and resources to design future missions and strategies for professionals in both emergency management and business continuity and their organizations. Develops an understanding of the relationships of vision to the future and relates that to the department of programs to protect lives, property and the environment at any level.
Prerequisites
For undergraduates, completion of required core and focus courses.

EM 499U Post-Baccalaureate Practicum
Semester hours: 1
Description
This practicum is an integrated directed study in the subject of the certificate program. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will explore a common theme present in three or more of their courses through preparation of either a professionally significant project or a major paper suitable for professional use.

EM 595U Hazards and Threats for the Future
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the future of disasters and their management in the context of long-term political, environmental, technological, economic and social change. Identifies current methods for futures analysis and provides a framework for developing tools and resources to design future missions and strategies for professionals in both emergency management and business continuity and their organizations. Develops an understanding of the relationships of vision to the future and relates that to the department of programs to protect lives, property and the environment at any level.

EM 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ENGL 101U Strategic Reading and Writing
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on critical reading and writing, providing instruction in grammar and mechanics, organizational and paragraph development skills, rhetorical techniques, and basic research. It will provide a collaborative environment in which students will employ a range of comprehension strategies to a variety of assigned texts, and it will encourage students to approach writing as a process by requiring prewriting, editing, and revision. It will also introduce basic research skills.

ENGL 201U Critical Writing and Research I
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on academic writing, critical reading, and research. Throughout the semester, it will require students to write on a range of topics for a variety of purposes and audiences, emphasizing writing as a process. It will also introduce a broad array of texts that are intended to improve students' critical reading skills. Finally, it will include training in research and proper methods of documentation.
Prerequisites
Satisfactory ACCUPLACER score or completion of ENGL 101U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ENGL 202U Critical Writing and Research II
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course focuses on academic writing, critical reading, and research, building on the skills developed in ENGL 201U. Throughout the semester, it will require students to write essays of varying length and purpose, culminating in a research-driven persuasive essay. It will also introduce a broad array of cultural texts that are intended to improve students' critical reading and analytical skills. Finally, it will include additional training in research and documentation.
Prerequisites
Completion of ENGL 201U with a grade of 'C' or better.

ENGL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6
Prerequisites
BALA students: ADED 301U; BLA students: ENGL 203U.

ENGL 554U The Global Short Story
Semester hours: 3
Description
Covers the short story in a global context, examining the ways authors from a variety of eras and cultures have approached short fiction. From the dark romanticism of Hawthorne to the magical realism of Marquez - and many stops in between - the course features works with a broad range of themes, styles, and techniques, all to demonstrate the ways that short fiction has been a unique laboratory for literary experimentation and innovation. The course places an emphasis on class discussion.

ENGL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

ENGL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

FIN 360U Financial Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
The foundations and tools of finance, including examination of financial markets, investments, and financial management in large corporations, small businesses, and personal financial planning.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U or higher, and ACCT 301U or equivalent preparation in financial accounting are required. Statistics course also recommended; may be taken concurrently.

FIN 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

FIN 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOG 201U World Geography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of world by regions, with emphasis on cultural differences among nations.

GEOG 202U Introduction to Geo-Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Current and emerging issues at the confluence of geography and international relations are examined. Emphasis on areas in transition or which pose a threat to global peace. Issues covered are globalization, terrorism, fundamentalism, multi-lateral organizations, modern warfare, economic development, and cultural and ethnic conflict.

GEOG 215U Urban Geography
Semester hours: 3
Description
Global pattern of increased urbanization and the features and structure of selected major cities are examined. Contrasts differences between cities in richer vs. poorer countries. Issues may include: overcrowding, slums and urban poverty, mass transportation, traffic congestion, segregation, environmental problems, culture, urban planning, gentrification, and urban sprawl.

GEOG 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 322U The Global Impact of Climate Change
Semester hours: 3
Description
Recent climate change and concern about global warming has been described as a threat to global security by some and as a great hoax by others. This course takes a dispassionate look at the evidence for climate change and considers the charge that manmade greenhouse gas emissions are to blame. First, students will review the evidence for global warming and climate change. Then they will explore the science behind climate change and investigate the impact of global warming around the world. Students will contrast the development of climate change policy in the United States, United Nations, Europe, and the developing world, and identify some of the economic and ethical issues involved. Next, they will use their knowledge to suggest changes in energy policy that could help mitigate the worst impacts of climate change and then finally recommend how society can adapt to climate change in the future.

GEOL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 522U Global Impact of Climate Change
Semester hours: 3
Description
Rapid climate change is causing an increase in the temperature of the atmosphere and oceans. This is a truly global problem that requires international research and collaboration to resolve. The USA is a major producer of the atmospheric "greenhouse" gases that make a significant contribution to this global "anthropogenic" warming. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the global environmental impact of anthropogenic climate change, and to challenge students to think about the possible impact of the way we live in the USA on poor, marginalized and at risk communities around the world.

GEOL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

GEOL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

GSCI 301U The Role of Science and Technology in Shaping the Modern Era
Semester hours: 6
Description
The opportunities and perils of scientific inquiry.

GSCI 302U Great Ideas in Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course is designed for non-science majors. The non-technical course integrates and focuses on major events of biology, chemistry, and physics that have shaped the course of science through the centuries. The idea behind each major advance is treated in its historic context, with special attention to its importance in mankind's understanding of the nature of the universe. Everyday examples will be incorporated in the course to help students understand the relationship between individuals and the natural world.

GSCI 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

GSCI 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HCA 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

HIST 300U Women and the American Experience
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of unique experience of women in history of U.S. from colonial times to present; attitudes held by and toward them; varied roles they have played in nation's development.

HIST 301U Women in European Civilization
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth study of place of women in European civilization and how ideas, institutions and practices of civilization determined and/or changed that place.

HIST 305U Richmond Across the Centuries
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of history of city of Richmond as it developed between 1660 and 1960.

HIST 312U Great Issues in American History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introductory course explores three central issues in American history: revolution and formation of constitutional government, causes of Civil War and process of Reconstruction; and rise of United States to role of world power.

HIST 315U Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S.: 1861 to the Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
Certain terrible catastrophes/disasters that America has suffered from 1861 to the present have had particularly strong influences on the nation. This course examines several such events, their impact, and how and why that impact took shape as it did. The role of presentation of the disasters through media, literature, government action, and especially the arts will be analyzed.

HIST 320U Virginia History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Social, cultural, and political history of Virginia from Colonial period to present.

HIST 321U Moments in Time I: World History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Using important events in world history, the course explores both content and method of historical study. Generally following the underlying teaching principle of the public radio program 'A Moment in Time' allows students to examine events in their historical context and take first steps toward becoming historians.

HIST 322U Moments in Time II: History of the Americas
Semester hours: 3
Description
Using important events in the history of the Americas, the course explores both content and method of historical study. Generally following the underlying teaching principle of the public radio program 'A Moment in Time' allows students to examine significant events in the Americas in their historical context.

HIST 323U Westward Ho!
Semester hours: 3
Description
Forging westward was part of American experience from colonial times. Examines causes, course, and results of drive West through events and developments including Lewis & Clark's Expedition, Manifest Destiny, Gold Rush, railway building, and conflict with Indian tribes. Popular literature on West and classic Westerns used to assess commonly held views of Americans on the Great West.

HIST 329U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

HIST 330U Road to the Presidency
Semester hours: 3
Description
The process of selecting an American president provides a window through which one can explore the political, social, cultural, and economic climate of the nation. By studying how the process was constructed and how that process has changed over time, in the context of specific noteworthy elections, memorable elements of the electoral process that have impacted presidential elections becomes apparent.

HIST 337U Tudor England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Political, institutional, social, and cultural study emphasizing reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.

HIST 338U Stuart England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Emphasis on conflict between Stuarts and Parliament. Cromwell and the Civil War, the Restoration and Revolutionary settlement.

HIST 345U The History of Ideas
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring the intellectual development within the western tradition.

HIST 347U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of life and times of Thomas Jefferson including historical perspective of him as statesman, politician, and writer as well as study of him as architect and planner. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

HIST 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HIST 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HIST 515U Great Disasters and Their Impact in the History of the U.S.: 1861 to the Present
Semester hours: 3
Description
Certain terrible catastrophes/disasters that America has suffered from 1861 to the present have had particularly strong influences on the nation. This course examines several such events, their impact, and how and why that impact took shape as it did. The role of presentation of the disasters through media, literature, government action, and especially the arts will be analyzed.

HIST 522U Moments in Time II: History of the Americas
Semester hours: 3
Description
Using important events in the history of the Americas, the course explores both content and method of historical study. Generally following the underlying teaching principle of the public radio program 'A Moment in Time' allows students to examine significant events in the Americas in their historical context.

HIST 529U Americans on the Move
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the patterns, meanings, causes and effects of migrations to and within America from the 17th century to the present. Among the topics covered are the 17th century European incursions into North America, the first westward movement in and from the Virginia colony, slavery and the Middle Passage, the great movement west following the Lewis and Clark expedition, the 'Trail of Tears,' the 'Great Migration' of African-Americans after the Civil War and in the 20th century, the displacement of Americans during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, the forced migration of Japanese Americans from their west coast homes during World War II, and the more recent movement of Americans to Sunbelt states, and as the result of natural disasters. The inspiration or other emotional impact of the arts -- plastic, literary, and performing -- on immigration and migration is an integral part of the course.

HIST 537U Tudor England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Political, institutional, social and cultural study emphasizing the reigns of Henry VII and Elizabeth I.

HIST 538U Stuart England
Semester hours: 3
Description
Emphasis on conflict between Stuarts and Parliament, Cromwell and the Civil War, the Restoration and Revolutionary settlement.

HIST 547U The Age of Jefferson
Semester hours: 3
Description
Comprehensive study of the life and times of Thomas Jefferson, including historical perspective of Jefferson as statesman, politician, writer, architect and planner. Use of primary sources is emphasized in the course. Includes field trips to Monticello, University of Virginia, and Virginia State Capitol.

HIST 548U Questions of Conscience: Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide
Semester hours: 3
Description
The course is designed to educate middle and high school teachers in Holocaust and genocide. It provides excellent tools necessary to teach such sensitive subjects to students. The course addresses many sections of the Virginia Standards of Learning for history, English, civics, economics, biology, art and music. Teachers will have the opportunity to delve into a wider range of topics, from the History of anti-Semitism, the Rise of Hitler and the Nazis, to Defining Genocide in the Contemporary Era.

HIST 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HIST 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HRM 343U Human Resource Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of traditional human resources functions and their relation to effective personnel and organizational results. Examines recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, collective bargaining, labor relations, training, human resource and management development, salary administration, and promotions and their relationship to communication, motivation, and leadership in organization.

HRM 345U Human Resource Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Design, implementation, and evaluation of training programs, with emphasis on increasing individual and organizational effectiveness. Includes adult learning theory, needs assessment, delivery methods, and techniques to measure trainer's effectiveness.

HRM 388U Internship
Semester hours: 3
Description
Applied experience in Human Resource Management in an organizational setting. Working closely with an assigned faculty member and a site supervisor, the student will be assigned projects or duties that are outside of his or her normal job. Intent is to offer the student opportunities to gain new knowledge or skills in the field of HRM. Students may receive credit for only one (1) internship while enrolled in the School of Professional and Continuing Studies.
Prerequisites
Student must complete the HRM Core Courses (15 credits) and application process prior to being considered for an internship.

HRM 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HRM 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HRM 452U Quality Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
History and origin of quality movement explored, along with basic tools and hands-on techniques necessary for successful quality and process improvement.

HRM 454U Compensation and Benefits
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the use of reward systems (especially monetary) in the motivation of goal-oriented behavior as a major factor in influencing behavior. The effects of reward systems on recruiting, performance, satisfaction, and tenure are examined. Explores pay system components such as: entry position rates, job evaluation systems, merit pay plans, and employee income security systems. Legal aspects such as federal wage and hour laws and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act are included.

HRM 460U HR and Technology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course offers an integration of human resource management with information technology. Provides insight and hands-on experience in evaluation, design, and implementation of use of automation with major functional areas of HR. Additionally, exploration of various resources such as software, platforms, intranet, and Internet will be included. Will use a practical versus theoretical approach.

HRM 467U International Human Resource Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course allows the student to place the role of HRM within a global perspective and demonstrates the borderless and fluid workforce which is emerging today. Aspects of the course will include issues such as outsourcing, worker visas, multi-national companies, cultural differences, immigration patterns and other global issues effecting HRM efforts today.
Prerequisites
Complete a minimum of 18 hours in the HRM curriculum to include HRM 343U before enrolling.

HRM 496U Directed Research
Semester hours: 3
Description
Courses in Directed Research are intended for students who wish to further develop their skills in research. Each student accepted to participate in a Directed Research course will work directly with a full time faculty member on a research project chosen by the faculty member. It is expected that such collaborations between the student and faculty member will lead to notable conference papers, and/or jointly authored research articles. Students will be made aware when Directed Research courses are available via an e-mail announcement from their respective departments. In most cases, one student will be chosen at the undergraduate and graduate level to participate in the course each semester according to faculty availability. Students will be selected based on their writing and research skills and their potential to contribute to the research project. Once chosen to participate in this research opportunity, his/her academic advisor will assist the student in registering for the course. Each student who is chosen to participate in the Directed Research opportunity will receive three credits hours in his or her academic program which can then be used toward the requirements for graduation. Please contact your academic advisor for further information.
Prerequisites
Students must be in their senior year of undergraduate study with a minimum GPA of 3.25 or above. Departmental approval required.

HRM 498U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-3

HRM 499U Senior Seminar in HRM
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course represents the summary experience for graduating seniors. The course includes a collection of case studies that allows the student to apply the knowledge obtained in previous HRM courses contained within the undergraduate curriculum.
Prerequisites
Complete a minimum of 18 hours in the HRM curriculum to include HRM 343U before enrolling.

HRM 531U Human Resource Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course in human resources uses an HR development point of view in which employees are considered assets to be developed rather than costs to be minimized. Topics include recruiting, hiring, training, retaining, rewarding, and promoting employees; employment planning, performance management systems, and succession planning; and managing outsourced relationships. Special attention is given to quality of working life issues; the balance between work and non-work; traditional and nontraditional incentives; and generational, cultural, and ethnic differences in employees' needs and values.

HRM 532U Legal Issues in Human Resource Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Every manager and HR professional will face numerous legal challenges to managing people in a workplace. In fact, employment-related litigation is one of the greatest financial risks facing any organization. This class will explore in a practical way the federal and state laws associated with hiring, firing and discipline, medical leave (including FMLA, ADA and worker's compensation), discrimination, harassment, immigration, labor law, unemployment compensation, religion in the workplace and state law torts including defamation and privacy. The course will also explore workplace investigations, workplace violence and employment-related legal processes, including EEOC Charges and lawsuits.

HRM 533U Quantitative Analysis and Research in HRM
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course exposes the student to the skills needed in order to analyze data pertaining to the HRM field such as retention patterns, compensation differences, performance measurements, etc. Attention will also be given to various research designs used to investigate issues within HRM. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics, regression, analysis of variance and research designs. Focus will be placed on finding answers to HRM questions.

HRM 534U Strategic Human Resource Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course includes an overview of business strategy and emphasizes the role of human resource management and development for effective strategy implementation. Models of organizational diagnosis and change, transformational leadership, reengineering, divesting, merging, acquiring, and downsizing are examined from a strategic and operational human resource perspective. Students will learn project management skills and integrate their course work by undertaking a major company-based project.

HRM 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HRM 635U Managing Compensation and Benefits
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the use of reward systems (especially monetary) in the motivation of goal-oriented behavior as a major factor in influencing behavior. The effects of reward systems on recruiting, performance, satisfaction, and tenure are examined. Explores pay system components such as: entry position rates, job evaluation systems, merit pay plans, and employee income security systems. Legal aspects such as federal wage and hour laws and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act are included.
Prerequisites
HRM 531U.

HRM 638U HRM Leadership Theory and Application
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course explores leadership theory as it pertains to the HRM environment. Focus will be given to the application of various leadership theories to address current challenges within the HRM field.
Prerequisites
HRM 531U.

HRM 639U Recruitment and Retention
Semester hours: 3
Description
Various methods for recruiting, selecting, and retaining employees are examined. Topics may include equal employment opportunity, human resource planning, determination of staffing needs, internal and external recruitment strategies, selection interviews, tests and assessment procedures, placement, promotion, transfer policies, and retention strategies.
Prerequisites
HRM 531U.

HRM 647U Human Resource Information Systems
Semester hours: 3
Description
Application of computer and communications technologies to solving HRM problems, e.g., labor sourcing; employee collaboration, training, and development; knowledge management; managerial decision-making. Use of multimedia, storage, and mobile devices, networks, HRIS database technologies, and collaborative Internet technologies supporting the contemporary workplace.
Prerequisites
HRM 531U.

HRM 650U Labor Relations
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course examines the historical relationship between management and labor unions as well as current and future issues facing the labor movement in the U.S. Specific emphasis will be placed on collective bargaining, grievance process, arbitration and negotiation. Differences and similarities between public and private sector labor relations will also be examined as well as comparisons of labor relations in other countries.
Prerequisites
HRM 531U.

HRM 657U HRM in the Global Environment
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey course which introduces students to the impact of the global environment on HRM efforts. Aspects of the course will include strategic positioning in the face of such issues such as outsourcing, worker visas, multi-national companies, cultural differences, and immigration.
Prerequisites
Complete a minimum of 18 hours in the MHRM curriculum to include ECON 507U and HRM 531U before enrolling.

HRM 696U Directed Research
Semester hours: 3
Description
Courses in Directed Research are intended for students who wish to further develop their skills in research. Each student accepted to participate in a Directed Research course will work directly with a full time faculty member on a research project chosen by the faculty member. It is expected that such collaborations between the student and faculty member will lead to notable conference papers, and/or jointly authored research articles. Students will be made aware when Directed Research courses are available via an e-mail announcement from their respective departments. In most cases, one student will be chosen at the undergraduate and graduate level to participate in the course each semester according to faculty availability. Students will be selected based on their writing and research skills and their potential to contribute to the research project. Once chosen to participate in this research opportunity, his/her academic advisor will assist the student in registering for the course. Each student who is chosen to participate in the Directed Research opportunity will receive three credits hours in his or her academic program, which can then be used toward the requirements for graduation. Please contact your academic advisor for further information.
Prerequisites
HRM 531U, and students must be in their second year of graduate study with a minimum GPA of 3.25 or above. Departmental approval is required.

HRM 697U Strategy and Policy
Semester hours: 3
Description
A capstone master's level course which uses a case study approach to integrate the skills and knowledge obtained within the curriculum to solve real HRM problems. Emphasis will be placed on developing effective strategy and policy from a senior managerial perspective.
Prerequisites
Complete a minimum of 18 hours in the MHRM curriculum to include ECON 507U and HRM 531U before enrolling.

HRM 699U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 300U Applied Ethics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of ethical choices, omissions, dilemmas and crises faced by individuals and organizations in the nonprofit, government, corporate, media, technology, environmental, and sports sectors. Use of ethics theories and the law as a framework to analyze case studies. This course will foster skills in ethical reasoning by encouraging students to analyze critically the consequences of individual and collective actions.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U

HUM 313U Career and Life Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of adult development and career topics to help students better understand how to successfully plan their lives. Focuses on stages of adulthood and transitions, skills assessments, career management strategies, life balance, and goal setting.

HUM 346U The History of Human Expression
Semester hours: 6
Description
Examination of the arts in their wide variety: visual, literary, plastic and melodic.

HUM 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

HUM 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 301U The Realm of Ideas I: Context and Chronology
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction to selected major ideas in ancient and modern world history, including philosophies, systems of belief, political ideologies, and concepts of social order; institutions through which the ideas have been manifested and implemented; methodologies used in the academic disciplines examined.

IDST 302U The Realm of Ideas II: Self, Society and Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction for liberal arts majors to important ideas in selected modern natural and social sciences, and methodologies used in their study and application.

IDST 303U The Realm of Ideas III: Human Expression
Semester hours: 3
Description
An introduction for Liberal Arts majors to important themes in selected significant movements in world literatures and arts; the methodologies used in their study and application.

IDST 304U Understanding Culture and Language I
Semester hours: 3
Description
Understanding Language and Culture I is designed to offer students an examination of the importance of language as the most critical component of a peoples' common culture and the key to understanding it. In the context of our pluralistic American society and the rapid globalization taking place in today's world such understanding of the relationship between language and the perspectives, practices, and products of cultures is increasingly important politically, economically, and socially.

IDST 305U Understanding Culture and Language II
Semester hours: 3
Description
Understanding Language and Culture II is designed to offer students an examination of the importance of language as the most critical component of a peoples' common culture and the key to understanding it. In the context of our pluralistic American society and the rapid globalization taking place in today's world such understanding of the relationship between language and the perspectives, practices, and products of cultures is increasingly important politically, economically, and socially.

IDST 306U Understanding Culture and Language
Semester hours: 6
Description
Understanding Language and Culture is designed to offer students an examination of the importance of language as the most critical component of a peoples' common culture and the key to understanding it. In the context of our pluralistic American society and the rapid globalization taking place in today's world such understanding of the relationship between language and the perspectives, practices, and products of cultures is increasingly important politically, economically, and socially.

IDST 310U The Examined Life
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring human behavior and the uniqueness of the human condition.

IDST 395U The Realm of Ideas IV: Capstone Seminar for Liberal Arts Majors
Semester hours: 3
Description
The capstone seminar for the Liberal Arts major: The culminating academic experience for liberal arts majors; emphasis on demonstrating through a substantive paper understanding of the connections among the liberal arts; also emphasis on relevant experiential learning opportunities.
Prerequisites
IDST 303U

IDST 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 495U Capstone Course: Senior Seminar
Semester hours: 6
Description
Capstone course for Weekend College.

IDST 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

IDST 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ISTY 301U Understanding the Global Village
Semester hours: 6
Description
Interdisciplinary course focusing on the trends in an increasingly interdependent yet fragmented world.

ISTY 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

ISYS 198U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-3

ISYS 301U Global Telecommunications Tech and Policy
Semester hours: 4
Description
Junior-level course in computer network communications external to organizations. Fundamental coverage of computer connectivity, data communication standards, telecommunication standards and methods, and data transfer requirements. Additional topics include transmission techniques, network interfacing, OSI model, PC and network server hardware and software, telephone systems, wide area networks. Emphasis on business and regulatory issues, and telecommunications challenges for multinational firms, as well as information and network security.
Prerequisites
College writing and mathematics, and foundation coursework or experience in IT.

ISYS 302U Local Area Networks
Semester hours: 4
Description
Junior-level course on concepts of shared and switched media local area networking including Ethernet (802.3), and Wireless (802.11). Topics include LAN definition, use, topologies, media, standards, network interface cards, protocols, repeaters, hubs, bridges, switches, and routers. Discussions include network design, the OSI Model, design rules, component selection, administration, management and TCP/IP. Students may present research projects on various networking topics.
Prerequisites
College writing and mathematics and foundation course work or experience in IT.

ISYS 303U IT Security
Semester hours: 3
Description
The study of computer and network security threats, prevention and response, from technology and management perspectives. Development of security plans and architectures reflecting organizational requirements.
Prerequisites
ISYS 302U or LAN background/experience.

ISYS 305U Collaborative Project Planning and Control
Semester hours: 1
Description
Course provides an introduction to project planning and control, as well as constraints encountered when collaboratively managing projects. Project planning processes such as developing project charters, scope statements and work breakdown structures are discussed. Covers how stakeholders can improve project management efficiency using collaborative software. Conducted using discussion, workbook assignments, homework and individual course project.

ISYS 306U Systems Analysis and Design
Semester hours: 3
Description
Methods and techniques necessary for conducting systems project, from feasibility analysis and specification of functional requirements through system implementation and evaluation. Includes participation in one or more systems design projects.
Prerequisites
College writing and mathematics and foundation course work or experience in IT.

ISYS 311U Database Design/Business Intelligence
Semester hours: 4
Description
Junior-level course in logical and physical design of database systems: rules of normalization in data modeling, SQL programming, and physical design issues impacting the I/O performance of commercial-level database management systems in Oracle. Introduction to data warehousing and business intelligence tools for corporate decision-making using Oracle Discoverer.
Prerequisites
College writing and mathematics and foundation course work or experience in IT.

ISYS 350U History of IT
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of information technology from its earliest origins to present-day computer-based information technology systems. Types and evolution of methods of conveying information in all its forms will be covered. Lectures and group discussions will be used to provide opportunities for students to present their discoveries of various aspects of information technology from an historical perspective.

ISYS 355U Computer Programming in Java
Semester hours: 4
Description
Concepts of structured and object-oriented programming, including data types, control structures, methods, arrays, strings, file operations, classes, and inheritance. Emphasis on effective programming skills to promote software reusability, reliability, and maintainability. Windows environment.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U, college algebra or higher, or programming experience.

ISYS 360U Electronic Commerce
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to electronic commerce terms, definitions, and concepts. Technological and strategic business aspects of successful e-commerce. Evaluation of e-commerce applications and the vital role they play in modern business practice. Students develop a business proposal for a commercial web site.
Prerequisites
College writing and mathematics, and foundation course work or experience in IT.

ISYS 365U Cloud Computing: Infrastructure and Services
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of cloud computing concepts and capabilities across various service models. Familiarizes students with use of vendor maintained applications and processes, and covers security and other challenges associated with cloud computing. Students learn how to configure and program cloud services, develop cloud-based software applications, and leverage technologies to build comprehensive end-to-end solutions on the cloud.
Prerequisites
ISYS 302U

ISYS 370U Introduction to Ethical Hacking and Pen Testing
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides analysts and managers with the competencies necessary to conduct and manage offensive IT security, through actual use of techniques and tactics used to simulate hacker and threat agent activity. Use of these methodologies to ethically test the efficacy of enterprise security systems and controls is discussed. Penetration testing, adversarial threat simulation, social engineering and IT security assessment topics are explored in detail. Includes practical exercises culled from real world security assessments.
Prerequisites
ISYS 302U

ISYS 375U IT Control and Audit
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of information technology (IT) control and auditing. Topics include assurance, security, control and audit with a focus on corporate IT governance frameworks. Control Objectives for Information and Related Technology (COBIT) framework used in auditor certification is examined in detail. Covers the roles and responsibilities of the information security auditor, discusses topics students need to become certified auditors, and helps them prepare for certification. Effects of emerging technology, such as cloud computing and server virtualization, are discussed in the context of the information systems audit.

ISYS 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6
Description
Selected topics in Information Systems

ISYS 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6
Description
Independent studies in Information Systems.

ISYS 450U Project Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Practical and theoretical foundation for IT project management. Concepts and techniques for evaluating business strategies and developing projects to align with strategic plans. Project planning and estimation, scheduling, staffing and teamwork, costing and budgeting, managing change. Use of computerized tools for project management, resource tracking, and reporting.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U or equivalent.

ISYS 490U Managing IT
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of case studies focusing on the real-life successes and failures of organizations as they manage situations impacted by information technology. Students take on the role of manager, consultant or other decision maker to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, and propose actionable solutions to resolve problems. Case studies cover a broad range of current information technology topics as well as business issues, technical issues and project management issues.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U or equivalent.

ISYS 491U IT Security Planning/Risk Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Exploration of digital security from a holistic, enterprise view. Threat and vulnerability assessment and analysis, planning and administration are discussed in detail. Techniques and strategies for risk mitigation are discussed in organizational terms. Processes for completion of comprehensive enterprise security plans using risk management techniques and methodologies are investigated.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U or equivalent

ISYS 492U Consulting and Design of Online Systems
Semester hours: 4
Description
This course is intended to help students develop necessary consulting skills for the preparation, design and use of online business information systems. It is typically taken in the student's final year of study. The course ties together previous courses in the Information Technology Management Program, helping participants understand all aspects of consulting and design through a complete management information systems design project. Participants work as a team to complete the systems design project with a real-world client, leading to a comprehensive requirements document.
Prerequisites
Department approval required. ISYS 450U or ISYS 306U required. 12 semester hours in ISYS preferred. ENGL 201U preferred for degree-seeking undergraduate students.

JOUR 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

LA 301U Introduction to Paralegal Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
The role of the paralegal and how law offices are managed. Introduction to the judicial system, contract law, torts, criminal law, corporate law, real property, family law, estate planning, legal research, legal writing, litigation, and paralegal ethics.

LA 302U The Judicial System
Semester hours: 3
Description
Structure and meaning of courts and their jurisdiction, procedure, and appeal; history and introduction to judicial process.

LA 303U Legal Research
Semester hours: 3
Description
Law libraries and basic legal research methods; where and how to gather information.

LA 304U Legal Writing
Semester hours: 3
Description
Legal terminology and writing styles, case analysis, development of analytical skills, exercises in legal composition and drafting.
Prerequisites
LA 303U.

LA 306U Litigation
Semester hours: 3
Description
It is NOT like television! A reality check on what real litigation looks like, this course provides an introduction to the field of litigation. Covers organization of the generic law office, fact investigation, flow of litigation, court system, commencement and defense of a law suit, discovery, evidence, motions practice, trial and trial preparation. Also touches on settlement and post-trial practice.

LA 310U Real Estate
Semester hours: 3
Description
Land and its elements; law of fixtures; types of easements and how they are created; acquisition of title and other interest in real estate property by deed, will, inheritance and adverse possession; co-ownership and marital rights; the legal and practical matters of real estate contracts for residential, commercial and construction transactions; plats of survey and legal descriptions; form and substance of deeds; recording priorities; and title examination and title insurance.

LA 312U Family Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course will cover all areas of family law, including marriage, divorce, annulment, division of property, child custody and support, spousal support and adoption.

LA 313U Evidence
Semester hours: 3
Description
In-depth study of selected Rules of Evidence and overview of Code of Professional Responsibility (Ethics).
Prerequisites
LA 306U.

LA 315U Torts
Semester hours: 3
Description
Rooted in the blood feud, tort law remains one of the most active areas in the law. Provides an overview of tort law, the tort case, and the three broad areas of intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability (with a focus on the elements of negligence). Also explores products liability, defamation, misrepresentation, malpractice and nuisance.

LA 316U Contract Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Law of formation, legal construction, execution, and enforcement of and remedies under contracts.

LA 320U Environmental Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of issues involved in the field through examination of major cases that have shaped the implementation of major federal environmental statutes since their passage beginning in the 1960s. Topics covered include the common law basis for environmental protection, constitutional and statutory authority to protect the environment, standing to bring environmental cases, the rules of judicial review, and substantive issues involving major environmental statutes and their implementing regulations. The cases are predominantly federal, but Virginia cases are used where appropriate.

LA 321U Criminal Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Addresses substantive knowledge, practical skills and competencies and ethical guidelines needed to work in criminal law area.

LA 323U Elder Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Concerns legal issues associated with the elderly client. Emphasizes the various legal issues encountered in an elder law practice, including the legal documents and forms normally required to address the legal needs of the elderly client.

LA 325U Wills, Trusts and Estates
Semester hours: 3
Description
As Benjamin Franklin is quoted as having said, two things in life are certain... death and taxes. Recognizing the truth of that statement, this course will cover the following topics: the purpose and need for a Will; the classification and definitions of property; the meaning and ramifications of Testate and Intestate Estates; the legal requirements for a Will; the preparation and drafting of Wills; Advance Directives; Planning for non-traditional families; the elements and purposes of Trusts; specialized Trust and gifts; the Executor or Administrator; Estate administration; tax consideration in estate administration; Probate; and, Ethics associated with an Estate Planning legal practice. There will be numerous real life examples and Virginia practice resources provided throughout the study

LA 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

LA 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

LAW 300U Business Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Principles of law relating to legal problems encountered in work environment, including contracts, business organizations, and secured transactions.

LAW 303U Constitutional Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Supreme Court and the major decisions of the Court rendered on issues including free speech, search and seizure and other police powers, war powers, property rights, civil rights, right to bear arms, separation of church and state, separation of powers among branches of the federal government, impeachment and other significant areas.

LAW 304U First Amendment Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
An overview and analysis of the laws protecting freedom of speech, religion, the press and privacy.

LAW 310U Great Trials in American History
Semester hours: 3
Description
This class investigates the great trials of the American judicial system in an effort to explore the emergence of the current justice system, including the development of trial record keeping, strategy and skills; the effect of the contemporary culture on the outcome of trial proceedings; and the divisive impact of some trials on the population of the United States. We will observe the impact of child testimony, media influence, jury bias, political influence and religious beliefs in the courtroom. The course will also consider the great orators in American law and their influence on trial outcomes and the development of the justice system.

LAW 315U Social Media Law and Ethics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of federal and state laws, regulations and policies, and ethical considerations regarding individual, non-profit and private sector use (and abuse) of social media. Given the scope of the topic, the course will include topics concerning intellectual property, business, employment, privacy, constitutional and advertising law.

LAW 322U Employment Law and Policy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Survey of federal and state statutes and laws that govern the employment relationship. Covers topics such as establishing the employment relationship, discharge of employees, employee discrimination, wages, hours, and benefits, conditions of employment, occupational safety and health, and other topics.

LAW 325U CyberLaw
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of federal and state laws, regulations and policies regarding operation and security of the Internet. Includes copyright, e-commerce and privacy issues.

LAW 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

LAW 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

LDSP 200U Introduction to Leadership Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to history and theory of leadership, to critical thinking and methods of inquiry as they bear on subject of leadership, to ethics of leadership, to basic leadership competencies, to relevant leadership contexts, and to leading groups and individuals.

LDSP 278U Communication in Leadership
Semester hours: 3
Description
Applied course to aid in the personal development of listening, writing, and speaking skills. Examination of leadership communication in organizational, group, and public contexts. Students will analyze their personal leadership styles and develop leadership communication skills through team projects and classroom exercises.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 302U Leadership and Ethical Action and the Law
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines current ethical issues such as privacy, legal dilemmas, work place ethics, and trends in corporate and governmental ethics. Applied ethics course where students will attempt to resolve ethical dilemmas faced by leaders in specific situations common to various work place environments. Focus on understanding ethical meanings, contexts, paradigms, and models associated with executive decision making. Emphasizes critical thinking, and oral and written communication skills as students read, analyze, debate in small groups, and make formal presentations.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 310U Leadership and Ethical Decision Making
Semester hours: 6
Description
Role of leader in commerce and service is examined.

LDSP 348U Leadership, Conflict Management and Group Dynamics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines the factors that contribute to the performance of effective groups. This includes exploring the kinds of interactions and human experiences typical in organizations and groups, how those interactions and experiences can facilitate achieving collective ends, and how they can impede accomplishing those ends. In addition, the causes of conflict and conflict-resolution strategies are covered via experiential exercises and research projects.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 358U Historical Perspective of Leadership
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analyzes leadership through the centuries by examining well-known leaders throughout history. Discusses the evolution of leadership thought through the ages. In addition, the role of long-term social, political, economic forces will be examined. Emphasis will be on application to actual leaders within their respective contexts.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 368U Leadership in the Global Environment
Semester hours: 3
Description
Explores leadership within a global context weighing issues such as culture, laws, language, and other differences. This course provides practical insights into leadership in the global environment. Topics covered include an analysis of global leading across cultures in modern societies.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U

LDSP 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

LDSP 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

LDSP 478U Strategic Thinking for Leaders
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides the necessary skills for the individual to begin thinking more strategically about their respective industries. This course provides an understanding of how strategic thinking relates to design, planning and implementation of strategies and tactics meant to accomplish the organization's goals and objectives.
Prerequisites
LDSP 200U.

LDSP 499U Post-Baccalaureate Practicum
Semester hours: 1
Description
This practicum is an integrated directed study in the subject of the certificate program. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will explore a common theme present in three or more of their courses through preparation of either a professionally significant project or a major paper suitable for professional use under the supervision of a faculty member.

MATH 103U Finite Mathematics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Logical thinking and problem-solving using sets, logic, numeration and mathematical systems, real number system, algebra, counting methods.
Prerequisites
ENGL 201U (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent

MATH 140U Algebra with Applications
Semester hours: 3
Description
Sets, functions, exponents, logarithms, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, inequalities, binomial theorems, sequences, series, complex numbers and linear programming.
Prerequisites
Departmental approval required.

MATH 150U Pre-calculus and Trigonometry
Semester hours: 3
Description
Concepts and applications of algebra and trigonometry. Topics include graphics, transformations and inverses of functions, linear, exponential, logarithmic, power, polynomial, rational and trigonometric functions.
Prerequisites
College algebra or departmental permission.

MATH 265U Applied Statistics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Fundamentals of statistical methods supporting data analysis for decision-making in social sciences, life sciences, and business. Descriptive statistics measuring central tendency and dispersion, basic probability, random variables, sampling distributions and statistical inference, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U or higher recommended.

MATH 270U Applied Calculus
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course content includes limits, continuity, differentiation, partial differentiation and integration of single and multi-variable functions with applications to managerial, life and social sciences.
Prerequisites
Pre-calculus or permission of the instructor.

MATH 300U Critical Thinking and Analysis
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of quantitative and qualitative data for decision-making in the business, law, governmental, and non-profit sectors. Application of common algebra, statistics, and basic calculus to solve common classes of problems.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U, Finite Mathematics, or college algebra or higher.

MATH 307U Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course introduces the skills needed in order to analyze data pertaining to the HRM field such as retention patterns, compensation differences, performance measurements, etc. Topics covered will include descriptive statistics as well as regression and analysis of variance. Focus will be placed on finding answers to HRM questions and problems using a quantitative approach.

MATH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MATH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MGMT 341U Principles of Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Fundamentals of management emphasizing application of scientific methods to solution of business problems; illustrations from various types of organizations, including manufacturing and service industries, government, charitable, and other social institutions.

MGMT 342U Managing Business Processes
Semester hours: 4
Description
Analysis, design, control, and improvement of business processes producing goods and services in business, legal, government, and non-profit organizations. Quantitative metrics and models to analyze operations, plan capacity, manage bottlenecks, and improve process flow rates for improved financial results. Cases and problems in process analysis, statistical process control, inventory, waiting lines, lean operations.
Prerequisites
MATH 103U (finite math) or higher.

MGMT 345U Business Literacy
Semester hours: 6
Description
Providing an overview of the issues facing those involved in domestic and international commerce.

MGMT 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MGMT 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MKT 321U Marketing
Semester hours: 3
Description
Activities by which the planning and exchange of ideas, goods, and services are explained from inception to final consumption. Analysis of markets and their environments, development of marketing strategy, evaluation and control of marketing programs.

MKT 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MLA 500U Methods and Themes in Liberal Studies
Semester hours: 3
Description
This core course will provide an overview of modes of inquiry, analysis and research particular to at least two of the following fields of study: Historical Studies, Literary Studies, Social Analysis, and the Visual and Performing Arts. A special theme (which may vary from term to term) will provide focus for the practical application of these methodologies. It will also emphasize writing skills, relevant computer technologies and library use. Topics vary from semester to semester. This course may be repeated, with the approval of the Coordinator, for credit.

MLA 506U Humanities Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the humanities. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

MLA 507U Social Sciences Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the social sciences. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

MLA 508U Science Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in science. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

MLA 510U Great Trials in American History
Semester hours: 3
Description
This class investigates the great trials of the American judicial system in an effort to explore the emergence of the current justice system, including the development of trial record keeping, strategy and skills; the effect of the contemporary culture on the outcome of trial proceedings; and the divisive impact of some trials on the population of the United States. We will observe the impact of child testimony, media influence, jury bias, political influence and religious beliefs in the courtroom. The course will also consider the great orators in American law and their influence on trial outcomes and the development of the justice system.

MLA 550U History of IT
Semester hours: 3
Description
The study of information technology from its earliest origins to present-day computer-based information technology systems. The types and evolution of methods of conveying information in all its forms will be covered. Lectures and group discussions will be used to provide opportunities for students to present their discoveries of various aspects of information technology from an historical perspective.

MLA 570U Independent Research
Semester hours: 1-3

MLA 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MLA 599U Seminar in Liberal Arts
Semester hours: 3
Description
Discussion of selected readings designed to assist student's drawing meaningful closure to the MLA program. Each student will develop a final project growing out of theme, interest or topic that has served to integrate student's program. Sharing of preparation and results of the projects will be an essential component of the course.

MUS 111U Appreciation of Music
Semester hours: 3
Description
For general student. Introduction to listening; present-day repertory and its historical development.

MUS 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MUS 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

MUS 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

MUS 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

NPS 501U Understanding the Nonprofit Sector
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on the origins, size, scope and composition of the nonprofit sector; operational issues encountered in the management of nonprofits; and the development of strategic solutions to manage and move the sector forward. Topics include theory, public policy, advocacy, management, collaboration, culture, strategy and innovation.

NPS 520U Financial Management and Budget Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on assessing financial performance, establishing policies for fiscal accountability, financial management, including budgeting, resource development, outcomes measurement, assessment, technology, and capital project analysis.

NPS 530U Law, Ethics and Governance
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines legal and ethical issues as they apply to nonprofit organizations.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 540U Resource Development and Promotion
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides a comprehensive examination of all major components of marketing strategy and their integration to build awareness of the nonprofit services and support for fundraising. Examines the policies, concepts and methods of marketing communication and fundraising including major gifts, annual giving, planned giving, comprehensive campaigns, stewardship and strategy.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 550U Strategic Human Resource Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
A comprehensive overview of how to strategically align an organization with a defined mission; focusing on partnerships with the board, staff, collaborative partners, and volunteers. Includes organizational assessments, leadership assessment, and HR management strategies for future sustainability and growth.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 562U Assessment and Program Evaluation
Semester hours: 3
Description
Provides an introduction and overview to the tools necessary to assess and evaluate programs in the nonprofit sector.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 566U Public Policy and Advocacy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Explores public policy and the policy making process as it relates to the nonprofit sector, including from a comparative perspective. Includes an examination of advocacy and lobbying.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 571U Social Entrepreneurship
Semester hours: 3
Description
Interdisciplinary exploration of the field of social entrepreneurship and the structures used by social entrepreneurs to affect change.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 577U Grant and Proposal Writing
Semester hours: 3
Description
Seeking funding from government and private foundations is highly competitive and requires both skill and art. This course will provide the background necessary to develop competitive funding proposals by exposing students to the basic skills, principles, and techniques of grant and proposal writing along with an overview of the funding process.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 590U Integrative Seminar
Semester hours: 3
Description
Integrative seminar with community-based learning project (or critical issues facing nonprofits). This course integrates the skills and knowledge obtained within the curriculum.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U and NPS 520U

NPS 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6
Description
Selected topics in nonprofit studies.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

NPS 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-3
Description
Independent study in nonprofit studies.
Prerequisites
NPS 501U

PBAD 338U Decision Making in Public Administration
Semester hours: 3
Description
Assists student to recognize decision-making process in public management/administration and to develop techniques to ensure timely decisions with accountability for action. Emphasis on determining methods of controlling administrative decisions within an organization while fostering atmosphere that allows decision making at appropriate level of organization.

PBAD 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PBAD 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PBRL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PBRL 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIL 302U Thinking About the Paranormal
Semester hours: 3
Description
A recent Gallup Poll shows that about three in four Americans hold some paranormal belief - in at least one of the following: extrasensory perception, haunted houses, ghosts, mental telepathy, clairvoyance, astrology, communicating with the dead, witches, reincarnation, and channeling. How reasonable are these beliefs? Can they be supported or discounted via modern science or are they purely a matter of faith or personal opinion? What makes one belief or explanation more reasonable than another? Is it immoral to hold beliefs that are not supported by strong evidence? This course examines these and other questions.

PHIL 303U Beyond Death
Semester hours: 3
Description
Is there any evidence to support claims of life after death? This course will begin with a critical examination of some of the purported evidence, based on claims of: Reincarnation, Mediumship, and Near Death Experiences. Philosophical underpinnings of the question will also be studied: What could count as evidence of life after death? What specifically about ourselves do we believe (or want to believe) survives death? What is a human soul? Finally, an examination of the psychological and moral implications of the belief in life after death will be made: Is it necessary or helpful for alleviating anxiety concerning death? Is there anything morally wrong with maintaining beliefs that are not supported by empirical evidence? Is belief in immortality necessary for a meaningful life?

PHIL 304U Asian Philosophy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces some of the methods, issues, and theories associated with major Asian philosophical religious systems, focusing on Hinduism, Early Buddhism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism. Addresses issues such as the nature of the sacred; the relationship between the Sacred and the self, life and death, happiness and meaning; and morality. Compares and contrasts approaches and answers to these issues between these traditions, as well as between these systems and "Western" philosophy and religion.

PHIL 305U The Problem of Evil
Semester hours: 3
Description
Traditionally in western philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil (or suffering) in the world with the existence of an omniscient (all-knowing), omnipotent (all-powerful) and omnibenevolent (all-good) God. Proponents of the problem assert: if God exists and has all these attributes, then there would be no evil; yet evil (i.e., tremendous suffering) clearly exists. In this course, we will examine various versions of this problem as well as various traditional and contemporary responses to it. Moreover, since the problem of reconciling evil/suffering with a conception of "the Sacred" extends beyond monotheism, we will also examine approaches to this general and deep problem from other major world religions.

PHIL 306U Religion and Science: Examining Big Questions
Semester hours: 3
Description
Throughout history, humans have appealed to religion to understand the universe and our place in it. In the eyes of many, modern science has taken over this role. But, are science and religion locked in a mortal struggle, or are they completely separate domains of the human experience, or are there actually points of concordance between the two? This course examines the relationship between religion and science, exploring the apparent conflicts in their methodologies and answers to life's biggest questions, including: the origin of everything, the nature of the self, the prospects of life after death, the existence of nature of the "Sacred," the foundation of morals, the essence of a "meaningful life," and the role of faith and reason in our lives.

PHIL 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIL 502U Thinking About the Paranormal
Semester hours: 3
Description
A recent Gallup Poll shows that about three in four Americans hold some paranormal belief - in at least one of the following: extrasensory perception, haunted houses, ghosts, mental telepathy, clairvoyance, astrology, communicating with the dead, witches, reincarnation, and channeling. How reasonable are these beliefs? Can they be supported or discounted via modern science or are they purely a matter of faith or personal opinion? What makes one belief or explanation more reasonable than another? Is it immoral to hold beliefs that are not supported by strong evidence? This course examines these and other questions.

PHIL 503U Beyond Death
Semester hours: 3
Description
Is there any evidence to support claims of life after death? This course will begin with a critical examination of some of the purported evidence, based on claims of: Reincarnation, Mediumship, and Near Death Experiences. Philosophical underpinnings of the question will also be studied: What could count as evidence of life after death? What specifically about ourselves do we believe (or want to believe) survives death? What is a human soul? Finally, an examination of the psychological and moral implications of the belief in life after death will be made: Is it necessary or helpful for alleviating anxiety concerning death? Is there anything morally wrong with maintaining beliefs that are not supported by empirical evidence? Is belief in immortality necessary for a meaningful life?

PHIL 504U Asian Philosophy
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduces some of the methods, issues, and theories associated with major Asian philosophical religious systems, focusing on Hinduism, Early Buddhism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism. Addresses issues such as the nature of the sacred; the relationship between the Sacred and the self, life and death, happiness and meaning; and morality. Compares and contrasts approaches and answers to these issues between these traditions, as well as between these systems and "Western" philosophy and religion.

PHIL 505U The Problem of Evil
Semester hours: 3
Description
Traditionally in western philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil (or suffering) in the world with the existence of an omniscient (all-knowing), omnipotent (all-powerful) and omnibenevolent (all-good) God. Proponents of the problem assert: if God exists and has all these attributes, then there would be no evil; yet evil (i.e., tremendous suffering) clearly exists. In this course, we will examine various versions of this problem as well as various traditional and contemporary responses to it. Moreover, since the problem of reconciling evil/suffering with a conception of "the Sacred" extends beyond monotheism, we will also examine approaches to this general and deep problem from other major world religions.

PHIL 506U Religion and Science: Examining Big Questions
Semester hours: 3
Description
Throughout history, humans have appealed to religion to understand the universe and our place in it. In the eyes of many, modern science has taken over this role. But, are science and religion locked in a mortal struggle, or are they completely separate domains of the human experience, or are there actually points of concordance between the two? This course examines the relationship between religion and science, exploring the apparent conflicts in their methodologies and answers to life's biggest questions, including: the origin of everything, the nature of the self, the prospects of life after death, the existence of nature of the "Sacred," the foundation of morals, the essence of a "meaningful life," and the role of faith and reason in our lives.

PHIL 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIL 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PHIS 521U Introduction to Public History
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the roots and relationships of the academic historical profession in historical societies, museums, archives and governmental institutions. Special emphasis placed on how institutions can collaborate to make the story of the past accessible to the public through media, presentations, exhibits, museums, and other interpretive vehicles and strategies.

PHIS 522U Managing Public History Organizations
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course focuses on financial management, legal matters, ethical issues and copyrighting as they apply to those engaged in the dissemination of historical information. Examines the organizational principles involved in developing short-term and long-term project management from conception and organization to execution.
Prerequisites
PHIS 521U

PHIS 523U Management of Historical Collections
Semester hours: 3
Description
Seminar designed to outline important issues like the care, acquisition and archiving of historical materials and public assets. Explores how historical record has been impacted by developments in the digital age. Includes a focus on documentary editing and the collection of oral history.
Prerequisites
PHIS 521U

PHIS 524U Marketing the Past: Methods of Historical Interpretation and Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Course examines the principles, concepts and methods of marketing and public relations as they are related to the promotion and preservation of historical topics and themes. Addresses methods to collect and respond to market data along with an exploration of budgeting models and their political implications. Discusses career options for public historians.
Prerequisites
PHIS 521U

PHIS 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PHYS 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-3

PLSC 205U Introduction to American Government
Semester hours: 3
Description
A multimedia, high-tech approach to the study of basic roles, structures, and functions of American political institutions; and introduction to American political process.

PLSC 207U Virginia Government and Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
A multimedia, high-tech approach to the study of Virginia government at state, county, municipal, and special district levels emphasizing legislative, executive, and judicial organization; and state politics and intergovernmental relations.

PLSC 301U The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship
Semester hours: 6
Description
Exploring the history and importance of civic participation in the American tradition. Service learning component.

PLSC 302U Modern Conservative Political Theory
Semester hours: 3
Description
An examination of the concepts of modern conservative political philosophy, their importance and influence.

PLSC 303U Metropolitan Problems and Politics
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of and practical involvement with major issues affecting metropolitan governments.

PLSC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PLSC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PLSC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PLSC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PSYC 101U Introductory Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Scientific principles of behavior. Survey emphasizing psychological methods and research involved in understanding human behavior.

PSYC 190U Child Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Introduction to biological, social, cognitive, and emotional processes of development during prenatal to preadolescent developmental periods.

PSYC 302U Psychology of Terrorism
Semester hours: 3
Description
In the past decade, terrorism has emerged as a dynamic force dramatically impacting individuals and social systems. During this course we will review the history of terrorism, seek to understand the radicalization of terrorists, investigate the immediate and long-term reactions to acts of terrorism and explore the social and psychological implications of the war on terrorism.

PSYC 303U Psychology of Gender
Semester hours: 3
Description
Overview of current theory and empirical research on gender, exploring origins of gender identity and impact of gender on systems, individuals, attitudes, and behavior.

PSYC 304U Psychology of Relationships
Semester hours: 3
Description
This course in social psychology is designed as an overview of the fundamental areas of the psychology of intimate and non-intimate relationships between people and the effects of these relationships on them. How and why are interpersonal relationships formed? What effects do they have on us? What do individuals do to relationships? Such questions will be explored in the course.

PSYC 305U Stress and Its Management
Semester hours: 3
Description
Physiological and psychological aspects of stressors and the stress response. Review of principles, research, and methods of stress management.

PSYC 306U Benign Bigotry: Psychology of Subtle Prejudice
Semester hours: 3
Description
Focuses on social problems concerning diversity and prejudices in today's society. Topics range from racism to gay rights, paying special attention to hostility, bigotry, and prejudice. Explores the feminist movement, racism, and the "neutrality zone," and zeroes in on perceptions of underground prejudice and internal conflicts. Differentiates between societal beliefs and misconceptions that contribute to human behaviors. Investigation includes current research and problems and challenges in today's society.

PSYC 307U Psychology of Faith
Semester hours: 3
Description
Study of reflections in faith, personal behavior, and social well-being. Topics include questions that college students encounter in basic psychology class. Is there a connection with faith psychology and other issues that have been taught? This class offers information concerning recent research within the major areas of psychological science and with the values of society. Investigations will be about the ideas of human nature and individual learning. Course will investigate behavior and attitudes and will look at science and spiritually. It will also identify major insights regarding human behavior and attitudes about positive belief systems and their individual intuition concerning their approach.

PSYC 308U Psychology of Intuitive Development
Semester hours: 3
Description
Intuition has remained an emerging cloud of mystery for centuries. Whether you have read about intuition from the earliest philosophers or the views of psychologists, it has still remained important in everyday decision making. If it is a gut feeling, a hunch or an inner knowing that can¿t be explained, this study of the intuitive ability encompasses intelligence and is being recognized as a perception within the body¿s psycho-physiological system. The psychology of intuitive development demonstrates the subconscious, or "heart intelligence" that can be cultivated and is essential for success in decision making, sensory and analytic process.

PSYC 313U Social Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Critical overview of current theory and research in social psychology, with emphasis on conceptual and empirical work on social cognition, social influence, affective processes, attraction, altruism, aggression, and group dynamics.

PSYC 327U Organizational Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examination of industrial/organizational theories and psychological principles as applied to the workplace. Will examine job analysis, the screening, selection, training and development of employees, the performance appraisal process, motivation and job satisfaction, stress, leadership, and organizational development.

PSYC 337U Psychological Development Across the Life Cycle
Semester hours: 3
Description
Developmental changes and psycho-biosocial processes from adolescent through adult life.

PSYC 338U Forensic Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Forensic Psychology is designed to give students an understanding of the interaction between our legal system and psychology. Roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists will be examined. Topics covered will include criminal profiling with a focus on serial killers; the insanity defense; criminal competencies; child custody cases; eyewitness and expert testimonies; civil commitment for dangerous offenders; and victimization.

PSYC 339U Abnormal Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Abnormal Psychology offers students an examination of theories and psychological principles underlying the study of abnormal psychology, the field, research methods, classification models, ethics and legal issues.

PSYC 340U Getting Away with Murder
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines deception, manipulation, and malingering within the context of violent and anti-social acts. Emphasizes psychological, social, and biological factors associated with extreme violence among clinical and non-clinical (normal) populations. Explores development of criminal behavior and moral development. Introduces techniques for detecting deception and preventing manipulation.

PSYC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 3

PSYC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

PSYC 502U Psychology of Terrorism
Semester hours: 3
Description
In the past decade, terrorism has emerged as a dynamic force dramatically impacting individuals and social systems. During this course we will review the history of terrorism, seek to understand the radicalization of terrorists, investigate the immediate and long-term reactions to acts of terrorism and explore the social and psychological implications of the war on terrorism.

PSYC 530U Organizational Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
The Organizational Psychology class will allow students to gain a broad understanding of many areas critical to effective human resource management. Further, the graduate level course will allow an in-depth understanding of many social sciences grounded theories and practices as applied to the real world business setting. The course will help students when faced with real world decisions including: determining selection strategies and selecting valid tools, how to drive performance and development with a performance appraisal tool, how to assess needs and train for results, how to develop and select effective leaders, how to design teams and deal with conflict, how to impact morale through satisfaction and motivation strategies, and how to manage and cope with work-related stress. The ultimate intention of the course is to equip students with the knowledge and tools they will need to positively impact their organizations.

PSYC 538U Forensic Psychology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Forensic Psychology is designed to give students an understanding of the interaction between our legal system and psychology. Roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists will be examined. Topics covered will include criminal profiling with a focus on serial killers; the insanity defense; criminal competencies; child custody cases; eyewitness and expert testimonies; civil commitment for dangerous offenders; and victimization. Graduate students will write an 8-10 page research paper on a controversial topic in forensic psychology and will develop and deliver a 15-30 minute presentation to the class on the research paper.

PSYC 540U Getting Away with Murder
Semester hours: 3
Description
Examines deception, manipulation, and malingering within the context of violent and anti-social acts. Emphasizes psychological, social, and biological factors associated with extreme violence among clinical and non-clinical (normal) populations. Explores development of criminal behavior and moral development. Introduces techniques for detecting deception and preventing manipulation.

PSYC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

PSYC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 200U Patterns in Religion
Semester hours: 3
Description
Methodologies for study of religion, recurring themes and issues, religious expression in both individual and communal focus.

RELG 301U The Bible as Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
An examination of the diverse genres of Biblical literature, viewing passages in historical context to understand the multiple layers of the intended message: period about which written, the time of the writer, and the time of the expected recipient. Within Biblical exegesis, primary emphasis is given to literary and historical criticism.

RELG 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 501U The Bible as Literature
Semester hours: 3
Description
An examination of the diverse genres of Biblical literature, viewing passages in historical context to understand the multiple layers of the intended message: period about which written, the time of the writer, and the time of the expected recipient. Within Biblical exegesis, primary emphasis is given to literary and historical criticism.

RELG 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

RELG 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 101U Introduction to Sociology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Fundamental concepts and principles of sociology; culture, socialization, social structure, stratification, social control, institutions, population, and social change.

SOC 305U Deviance
Semester hours: 3
Description
Social deviance at micro-sociological level, sociological explanations for and current methods of dealing with such behavior. Drug and alcohol abuse, sexual deviance, suicide, mental illness, and child and spouse abuse.

SOC 309U Social Problems
Semester hours: 3
Description
Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment: physical and mental handicaps; economic inadequacies; programs and methods of social treatment and control.

SOC 310U Criminology
Semester hours: 3
Description
Laws, prevalence and distribution of crime; theories of crime; types of criminal behavior; police actions; court actions; the penal system.

SOC 316U Race and Ethnicity in America
Semester hours: 3
Description
Native peoples; immigration and settlement of U.S.; racial and ethnic groups; prejudice and discrimination; race relations in racially and culturally diverse society.
Prerequisites
SOC 101U.

SOC 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 598U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SOC 599U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

SPAN 100U Practical Everyday Spanish
Semester hours: 3
Description
Multifaceted course designed to appeal to individuals interested in using Spanish language for business or for travel.

SPCH 101U Principles of Speech Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Confidence in delivering public speeches. Logical structure of ideas, effective use of language, application of evidence to arguments. Classroom speeches and critiques.

SPCH 105U Interpersonal Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Analysis of complex and interacting factors that contribute to effective transmission of ideas; emphasis on understanding underlying principles.

SPCH 206U Group Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Modern theory and methodology; student participation in group discussion relating theory to specific communication problems.

SPCH 222U Business and Professional Speech
Semester hours: 3
Description
Making business presentation and giving corporate advocacy speech. Application to workplace of skills in listening, problem solving, interviewing, conducting meetings.

SPCH 328U Gendered Relationships - An Overview
Semester hours: 3
Description
Investigation of relatively informal interpersonal and social relationships between same and opposite genders in friendships, romantic relationships, families and the workplace. Central organizing theory base is that of interpersonal communication theory. Seminar style where student participation is maximized.

SPCH 329U The Dark Side of Communication
Semester hours: 3
Description
Relies on scholarly research to ignite discussion and debate on the value of the "dark side" paradigm, a metaphor used to examine immoral,abusive, dysfunctional, destructive and criminal dimensions of interpersonal communication. Topics include infidelity, bullying, intimate partner abuse, jealousy, stalking, child abuse, parent abuse, deception, and secrets.

SPCH 340U Cross-Cultural Communications
Semester hours: 3
Description
Studies dynamics of cross-cultural communication. Emphasis on familiarizing students with issues relating to diversity and improving student's skills in communication across cultural barriers.

SPCH 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

SPCH 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

THTR 398U Selected Topics
Semester hours: 1-6

THTR 399U Independent Study
Semester hours: 1-6

Contact Us

Special Programs Building
490 Westhampton Way
Univ. of Richmond, VA 23173
Phone: (804) 289-8133
Fax: (804) 289-8138
spcs@richmond.edu

Monday-Friday: 8:30am–5pm
Closed for University holidays